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From: mosaic-w@void.ncsa.uiuc.edu (Windows Mosaic Tech Support)
Newsgroups: comp.os.ms-windows.announce
Subject: NCSA Mosaic for MS Windows 1.0 release notice (Win31- Winsock)
Keywords: NCSA Mosaic Winsock Windows 3.1
Message-ID: <1993Nov15.174007.408.comp.os.ms-windows.announce@pitt.edu>
Date: 11 Nov 93 23:00:09 GMT
Sender: news+@pitt.edu
Reply-To: mosaic-w@void.ncsa.uiuc.edu (Windows Mosaic Tech Support)
Followup-To: comp.os.ms-windows.apps
Organization: Nat'l Center for Supercomputing Applications
Lines: 103
Approved: infidel+@pitt.edu


We are happy to announce the official final release of NCSA Mosaic for
Microsoft Windows version 1.0.

NCSA Mosaic is a distributed hypermedia system designed for information
retrieval and discovery over the global Internet.  Mosaic provides a unified
hypermedia interface to the various protocols, data formats, and information
archives used on the Internet and provides powerful new methods for discovering
and using information.  Mosaic is capable of accessing data via protocols such
as Gopher, World Wide Web, FTP and NNTP (Usenet News) natively, and other data
services such as Archie, WAIS, and Veronica through gateways.

NCSA Mosaic for Microsoft Windows is a WinSock client program.  It requires
network (TCP/IP) access through the WinSock DLL interface.  If you are using
Windows NT, this is built in. If you are using Windows 3.1, you need to
obtain a WinSock and install it on your system.  There is an alpha version of
a shareware WinSock on our FTP server.  If you are running a commercial TCP/IP
stack, such as FTP Software's, you need to obtain their WinSock DLL directly
from your LAN vendor.

BUG REPORTS AND ENHANCEMENT REQUESTS should be emailed to
"mosaic-win@ncsa.uiuc.edu".  PLEASE INCLUDE THE VERSION NUMBER YOU ARE USING
IN ANY MAIL YOU SEND US.  Thank you for your interest and support.

The beta release is via anonymous FTP on NCSA's FTP server, "ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu"
(141.142.20.50), in the directory "/PC/Mosaic".

This directory contains the following files:

readme.now   - General info on Mosaic.
wmos1_0.zip - executable & support files for NCSA Windows Mosaic.
sockets	     - This directory contains a copy (not necessarily the most
               recent) of Peter Tattam's Trumpet Winsock, a shareware
               WinSock sockets library.
old          - This directory contains old beta versions of Windows Mosaic.
viewers      - This directory contains external viewers we have found to
               be useful with Windows Mosaic.

If you do not have your own WinSock1.1,  and you want a WinSock that will be
useful for programs other than only NCSA Mosaic, then we would suggest trying
the alpha release of the Trumpet WinSock, available in the "sockets"
subdirectory (although this copy may not be the latest released.)


-Chris Wilson
-Jon Mittelhauser

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
New features since the 0.7b beta release:
-----------------------------------------
The scrolling bug is fixed.   You shouldn't see the screen mess up due
    to images or large text in the document anymore.
Network I/O is now <B>interruptable</B>.  Click on the big
    Mosaic icon in the upper-right corner to kill a net transfer.
Also, quitting Mosaic forces a kill of any net transfers in progress.
    This means the "Can't run two instances of the same program" error message
    shouldn't appear anymore.
Images can now be aligned middle, top, or bottom, instead of just top.
    Considering that the default is bottom, and we only did top before, I
    was pretty surprised that no-one mentioned this anomaly throughout all
    our beta testing.
News articles are now readable (i.e., not all on one line.)
URL redirection (a feature of HTTP 1.0) is now supported.
Home Page loading is fixed.
If you were having problems with the first document you tried never
    loading, but subsequent ones working fine, that's fixed.
Title and URL boxes are redrawn at the correct time now.
Back & Forward Assertion Failed errors are gone.
Telnet executable (used for telnet:// URLs) is now configureable - see
    "telnet=" under the Viewers section of the INI file.
FTP error messages are now returned to the user.
FTP logins now use your email address when logging in (this fixes a
    connect problem the CERN LibWWW was creating.
You can log in to a NON-anonymous FTP via the following method: set the
    URL to be FILE://username@machine/pathname.  For example, to log in
    as user "jdoe" to FTP site "ftp.yoyodyne.com", in the "/usr/jdoe"
    directory, give the URL:
        "file://jdoe@ftp.yoyodyne.com/usr/jdoe"
    Mosaic will pop up a dialog box, asking to confirm the username and
    give your password.  <B>Your password is maintained within Mosaic
    until you quit. Do <I>NOT</I> use this feature if you are
    security-paranoid.</B>
Gopher and FTP now use pretty icons for files/directories/etc, and FTP
    shows the file sizes.
New set of Configured Menus, with all kinds of pointers.
Horizontal rules are prettier now.


Known bugs
----------
There is a bug with local file support, particularly with directory viewing,
   that causes GPFs.
Mosaic loses some GDI resources each time you run it.  Restart Windows to
   regain the resources lost.

Future Features
---------------
Forms support
Printing
User authorization
User Interface to Hotlist/Configureable menus
Document saving
Online documentation
Copy document to Clipboard

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