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From: hlu%decserv1@dns1.eecs.wsu.edu
Subject: Bug in 387 support and libm.a
Reply-To: hlu%decserv1@dns1.eecs.wsu.edu
Date: Sat, 25 Jan 1992 23:13:37 GMT

Hi,

I just ported dj's libm.a to Linux with a co-processor. I think I
fixed a bug with the co-processor support. But I am not very sure what I
am doing. Is anyone running Linux with a co-processor? i.e., 387 or
486DX. I can post the patches and the sources code for the library, or
put them on nic and tsx-11, if necessary. I also added the detection
for 486. But I was not able to test it (My PC is 386sx/387sx.).

I have a suggestion. I think it would be nice to be able to load the
387 emulation stuffs during the booting time after the kernel finds out
there is no 387. Or at least, the kernel can be made without it by just
changing something in Makefile. I think I may want to do it if I have
the time.

I believe some 387 emulation code can be borrowed from dj's gcc/g++
for MS-DOS.

BTW, could someone please tell me where I can find config files for
compiling gcc. I need to compile gcc (gcc only, no cc1 and cpp) since
the default of gcc I got is no 387. I keep forgetting to add -m80387.


Thanks.


H.J.
-- 
School of EECS                          Internet: hlu@eecs.wsu.edu
Washington State University             BITNET:   60935893@WSUVM1.BITNET
Pullman, WA 99164                       Phone:    (509) 335-6470 (O)
USA    

From: Hongjiu Lu -- Graduate Student < hlu@coea.wsu.edu>
Subject: Re: Bug in 387 support and libm.a
Reply-To: hlu@coea.wsu.edu
Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1992 19:53:29 GMT

| 
| In article < 1992Jan25.231337.9053@athena.mit.edu> you write:
| >
| >I just ported dj's libm.a to Linux with a co-processor. I think I
| >fixed a bug with the co-processor support.
| 
| Could you please elaborate? Was this in error handling/emulation or
| what? Send diffs if you have access to them, so that it can be corrected
| in the next version..
| 
|               Linus
| 

I think the bug about 387 is all the floating point exceptions are
masked out. It may cause trouble for some math routines. I am still
testing the 387 support.

Beside the kernel, the compiler doesn't support 387. I found some
strange things, like

1) double foo = 1.2234E34;
does not work. Gcc translates it to foo = 1.2234.

2) foo = 0.0/0.0 hangs. No error reported. Is that a compiler bug or
kernel bug?

I am going to compile a new gcc and libc.a with 387 support. The
current gcc and libc.a stink with 387. I hope I can finish it by this
week. I will build a full libm.a for 387 and may add some entries to
libc.a, like getpass (), etc. Any suggestions?

BTW, has anyone added the system call, rename (), to libc.a? I'd like
to have it in my libc.a.

After some testing, I will put them on the ftp sites. For the machines 
with 387, it may need to recompile some programs. Because the kernel
has to be modified to get 387 support, some programs may not run very
well. I hope that will not be the case. I will test it first. Even if
old programs works fine, recompile them is still a good idea to take
advantage of 387.


H.J.
-- 
School of EECS                          Internet: hlu@eecs.wsu.edu
Washington State University             BITNET:   60935893@WSUVM1.BITNET
Pullman, WA 99164                       Phone:    (509) 335-6470 (O)
USA                                               (509) 334-6315 (H)

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