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From linux Fri Feb 14 22:36:39 1992
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Date: Fri, 14 Feb 92 13:31:10 +0000
From: db1@ukc.ac.uk
To: linux-standards@concert.net
Subject: Root, partitions, directoryes

It seems to me that it is not clear why we need root to have 
home in / and why something is needed in /bin /lib /etc

The point is to minimize the possible damage from a disk crash
and be able to do admin even with a half broken system.

Usually you put swap and root in one phisical disk and all the
rest of the partitions somewhere else. By doing this you 
have less probability that a crash of ONE of your disks is going to 
make your systm useless.

Infact if you have swap, root and all admin commands ( essential )
in one disk you can "repair" the damage fairly quickly.

The point is to select whta commands are "essential" ...... to do
repairing.

Something like

format 
mkfs
init
login
getty
sh
vi
......

Anyway. I don't think root HAS to have .exrc .bashrc .mailrc ......
remembar the su is supposed to leave the environ intact
if you do not do su -

Damiano

From linux Fri Feb 14 22:50:56 1992
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Date: Fri, 14 Feb 92 21:50 CST
From: dws@engr.uark.edu (David W. Summers)
To: db1@ukc.ac.uk
Subject: Re: Root, partitions, directoryes
Cc: linux-standards@concert.net


Maybe part of the problem people are having with directories in certain places
in the file system structure is that there has not been any talk (that I've
seen) about what partitions are assumed.

I know that on a SUN, there is the / (root) partition, a /usr partition which
is read-only, a /home partition for the users and a /var partition where
/var/tmp, /var/spool, etc. are place in.

Maybe this can help clear up why some people like directories in certain
places in the file system tree??????????


   - David Summers

From linux Sat Feb 15 12:46:52 1992
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Date: Sat, 15 Feb 92 12:45:53 -0500
From: tytso@ATHENA.MIT.edu (Theodore Ts'o)
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To: dws@engr.uark.edu
Cc: db1@ukc.ac.uk, linux-standards@concert.net
In-Reply-To: David W. Summers's message of Fri, 14 Feb 92 21:50 CST, 
<m0lFGPr-00014LC@engr.uark.edu>
Subject: Re: Root, partitions, directoryes
Reply-To: tytso@athena.mit.edu
Address: 1 Amherst St., Cambridge, MA 02139
Phone: (617) 253-8091

   Date: Fri, 14 Feb 92 21:50 CST
   From: dws@engr.uark.edu (David W. Summers)

   I know that on a SUN, there is the / (root) partition, a /usr
   partition which is read-only, a /home partition for the users and a
   /var partition where /var/tmp, /var/spool, etc. are place in.

Hold on a second!  Sun can assume that people need to have so many
partitions, because after all, Sun is a hardware manufacturer and makes
money selling disks.  Some of us may not have the luxury of throwing so
many disks/partitions at the problem.  That's why I've been plugging
/usr/home.  People with one /usr partition can have /usr/home be in the
same partition as /usr, and people with more disks (and by extension,
money) to burn, can mount one of their copious numbers of partitions on
/usr/home.  

In contrast, if you use /homes then you must either use a sym link from
/usr/homes to /homes, which gets confusing to users --- or you have to
use another partition.  (Theoretically, I suppose you have a third
options of using one gigantic partition and mount it in /, but that's
not very satisfying either.)

I do agree, though, that we should just adopt the draft filesystem
standard, since I doubt we will be able to get accomplish much more by
merely flaming on the subject.  To give it credit, it looks a lot less
like a camel(*) than many other standards efforts which I have seen, and it
is definitely better than what we have now.

						- Ted

(*) Definition of a camel: a horse designed by committee

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