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From: pwilson@world.std.com (Pete Wilson)
Subject: How to submit stuff?
Date: Wed, 28 Oct 1992 01:30:53 GMT

Sorry if this is a FAQ.

We have developed a portable SNMP Agent which we are considering
submitting for inclusion in Linux.

Could someone tell me what this submittal process involves?
--
Thanks, Pete Wilson (pwilson@world.std.com)

From: wirzeniu@klaava.Helsinki.FI (Lars Wirzenius)
Subject: Re: How to submit stuff?
Date: 28 Oct 92 10:57:13 GMT

pwilson@world.std.com (Pete Wilson) writes:
>We have developed a portable SNMP Agent which we are considering
>submitting for inclusion in Linux.
>
>Could someone tell me what this submittal process involves?

If you want it to be part of the kernel, make patches against the most
recent kernel version and send them to Linus
(torvalds@kruuna.helsinki.fi).  If it is something that needs to be part
of an existing package, send it to the maintainer of that package. 
Otherwise, it is something that exists more or less independently
(although it can of course require other software to be installed in
order to work), so you can just package it yourself, upload it to an FTP
site, and announce it on the mailing lists and/or newsgroup (put
ANNOUNCE in the subject line so that I won't miss it for Linux News :-).

--
Lars.Wirzenius@helsinki.fi  (finger wirzeniu@klaava.helsinki.fi)

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