Tech Insider					   Technology and Trends


			   USENET Archives

Newsgroups: comp.unix.amiga
Path: gmd.de!rrz.uni-koeln.de!unidui!math.fu-berlin.de!xlink.net!
howland.reston.ans.net!agate!doc.ic.ac.uk!uknet!bnr.co.uk!bnrgate!bmerh85!
bmerh85!hamish
From: Hamish.Macdon...@bnr.ca (Hamish Macdonald)
Subject: Linux/68k 0.05.1
Message-ID: <1993Sep15.152418.6751@bmerh85.bnr.ca>
Sender: n...@bmerh85.bnr.ca (Usenet News)
Organization: I speak for nobody but myself
Date: Wed, 15 Sep 93 15:24:18 GMT
Lines: 146

This message announces the availability of patch-level 1 of Linux/68k
version 0.05.

It can be ftped from directory /pub/linux/680x0 at tsx-11.mit.edu.

The directory structure in this directory has changed:

 - All sources (including kernel sources) can be found in the "src"
   subdirectory.
 - The kernel executable and Amiga "bootstrap" program can be found in
   the "kernel" subdirectory.
 - File-system images can be found in the "filesys" directory.
 - The "lib" subdirectory contains compiled libraries for development
   of programs intended to run under linux/68k.
 - The "tools" subdirectory still contains various tools needed to
   build and develop for linux/68k.

The new features of this release over 0.05 include:

*) Many bugs fixed.

*) linux/386 patches up to 0.99pl10 applied.

*) SCSI drivers for Amiga 3000 (tested) and Amiga 2091 (untested)
   included.  USE AT YOUR OWN RISK.

*) Floppy driver somewhat fixed (reading appears to work correctly.
   There still appear to be problems with writing to higher numbered
   tracks).  Amiga floppy gurus might want to examine the code.

*) Amiga Fast File System code in place (file system type "affs").
   This allows you to mount an AmigaDOS FFS partition from Linux.  I
   find this quite useful to copy files over from my development
   environment.

*) More abstraction of architecture and machine dependencies.

*) Signal handling works, including handling of a SIGSEGV as a result
   of a BUS ERROR or ADDRESS ERROR.

This release still contains only support for the Amiga.  Hopefully the
people working on MacIntosh and Atari support will have some sources
for inclusion soon.  This release does not have the changes to support
the 68040. I hope to have those changes in the next release.

Please let me know if this kernel runs on your Amiga, and the type of
Amiga and cards/peripherals you have.  The compressed minix file system
in the "filesys" directory can be used as a ram disk to boot with the
kernel, or can be copied to a floppy or SCSI hard disk.

To boot the kernel on an Amiga, use the supplied "bootstrap" command
(found along with the kernel in the kern-005.1.tar.gz file in the
"kernel" subdirectory).

To boot with the ram disk image, uncompress the file system image and
type:

  bootstrap -r filesys

To boot from a floppy image, uncompress the file system image and copy
it to an Amiga format floppy.  This can be done using the "flat:"
handler.  Then type:

  bootstrap

If you somehow have a linux/68k minix file system on a SCSI hard disk
partition, you can boot from the partition by supplying the device
number to the bootstrap program:

   bootstrap -b [number]

The major number for SCSI disks is "0x08", and the minor number
depends on the disk and partition. linux/68k searches for SCSI disks
from target 0 to target 7, and for Logical Units 0 through 7 on each
target.  The minor number can be calculated by (disk_number)*16 +
partition_number.  The first disk found is disk 0.  Partition 0 is the
whole disk.  Partition 1 is the first partition found in the
RigidDiskBlock partition table on the Amiga hard disk.  Thus 0x0801 is
the first partition on the first disk found.  0x0818 is the second
partition on the second hard disk found.

For example, I have two SCSI hard disks.  The first is at target 5,
LUN 0 and the second at target 6, LUN 0.  The first has three
partitions, used for Linux and the second has 4 partitions used for
AmigaDOS.

Thus I have:

   devnum         linux device name
   ------         ------------------------------------
   0x0800         sda  (the entire disk at target 5 : BE CAREFUL)
   0x0801         sda1 (1st partition on disk at target 5)
   0x0802         sda2 (2nd partition on disk at target 5)
   0x0803         sda3 (3rd partition on disk at target 5)
   0x0810         sdb  (the entire disk at target 6 : BE CAREFUL)
   0x0811         sdb1 (1st partition on disk at target 6)
   0x0812         sdb2 (2nd partition on disk at target 6)
   0x0813         sdb3 (3rd partition on disk at target 6)
   0x0814         sdb4 (4th partition on disk at target 6)

My Linux root partition is on the 2nd partition of my first drive, so
I boot with:

  bootstrap -b 0x0802

After booting from one of the above methods, if the kernel supports
your SCSI driver, you should be able to create a minix file system on
one of your hard disk partitions if you wish.  

Determine the size of your partition in 1K blocks (take the number of
512 byte sectors from HDToolBox and divide by two), and determine
which special file to use in /dev (see above).  *DOUBLE CHECK* that
the major/minor numbers for the special device (ls -l /dev/xxx) are
correct.  If they are incorrect or the device special file doesn't
exist, use mknod to change or create the device special file.  Then
execute:

   /etc/mkfs /dev/xxxx size

This will create a minix file system on the hard disk partition.  You
can then mount this partition under /mnt and copy files to it:

  /etc/mount /dev/xxxx /mnt

When finished copying, unmount the partition:

  /etc/umount /mnt

sync a few times, and then reboot.  You can then boot the kernel by
providing "bootstrap" with the device number to boot from.

Again, you do any mucking around with hard disks at your OWN RISK.  I
bought a separate hard disk to use solely for linux before I began
playing with hard disk drivers and file systems for safety purposes.

DEBUGGING NOTE: The early stages of the kernel startup will send out
characters to the serial port to indicate how far it gets.  The serial
port is set to 9600 baud, 8 bits, one stop bit.  You'll need a NULL
modem to hook it up to a terminal.  It doesn't play around with any of
the modem control bits, so your terminal will have to ignore those.
If you get "ABCD" on your terminal, the initial startup worked (i.e.
arch/head.S got as far as the call to mm_init, found in mm/memory.c).
Otherwise, something got messaged up in creating the initial virtual
memory environment.

Path: gmd.de!xlink.net!howland.reston.ans.net!gatech!concert!corpgate!
nmerh207!bmerha64.bnr.ca!fwpnews!hamish
From: Hamish.Macdon...@bnr.ca (Hamish Macdonald)
Newsgroups: comp.unix.amiga,comp.os.linux.development
Subject: Linux/68k Version 0.06 released
Date: 24 Nov 1993 22:06:20 GMT
Organization: I speak for nobody but myself
Lines: 129
Distribution: world
Message-ID: <2d0lss$kok@bmerha64.bnr.ca>
NNTP-Posting-Host: bcarh5d2.bnr.ca

This message announces the availability of version 0.06 of Linux/68k.

It can be ftped from directory /pub/linux/680x0 at tsx-11.mit.edu.

A precompiled kernel executable and the Amiga "bootstrap" program can
be found in kern-0.06.tar.gz in the "kernel" subdirectory.

The kernel source can be found in linux-0.06.tar.gz in the "src"
subdirectory.

Compilation of this new version of the kernel requires gas-2.2.  Minor
changes to the stock gas-2.2 distribution were required in order to
generate an m68k-linux assembler.  The patches for these changes are
available in the "tools" subdirectory.

The new features of this release over 0.05 include:

*) A number of bug fixes.

*) linux/386 patches up to 0.99pl13 applied.

*) A memory management rewrite supporting the following new features:
   1) 68040 support.  I've made the changes that I think are required
      in order to support the 68040.  *I am unable to test these, so
      I'll have to leave it up to someone else with an '040 to test
      them*, and notify me of problems/changes required..
   2) Multiple non-contiguous memory chunks (Linux will now use all
      the FAST memory on an Amiga).

* 68040 Floating Point Support Package incorporated.

This release still contains only support for the Amiga.  Hopefully the
people working on MacIntosh and Atari support will have some sources
for inclusion soon.

Again, note that the 68040 changes need debugging.

Please let me know if this kernel runs on your Amiga, and the type of
Amiga and cards/peripherals you have.  The compressed minix file system
in the "filesys" directory can be used as a ram disk to boot with the
kernel, or can be copied to a floppy or SCSI hard disk.

To boot the kernel on an Amiga, use the supplied "bootstrap" command.

To boot with the ram disk image, uncompress the file system image and
type:

  bootstrap -r filesys

To boot from a floppy image, uncompress the file system image and copy
it to an Amiga format floppy.  This can be done using the "flat:"
handler.  Then type:

  bootstrap

If you somehow have a linux/68k minix file system on a SCSI hard disk
partition, you can boot from the partition by supplying the device
number to the bootstrap program:

   bootstrap -b [number]

The major number for SCSI disks is "0x08", and the minor number
depends on the disk and partition. linux/68k searches for SCSI disks
from target 0 to target 7, and for Logical Units 0 through 7 on each
target.  The minor number can be calculated by (disk_number)*16 +
partition_number.  The first disk found is disk 0.  Partition 0 is the
whole disk.  Partition 1 is the first partition found in the
RigidDiskBlock partition table on the Amiga hard disk.  Thus 0x0801 is
the first partition on the first disk found.  0x0818 is the second
partition on the second hard disk found.

For example, I have two SCSI hard disks.  The first is at target 5,
LUN 0 and the second at target 6, LUN 0.  The first has three
partitions, used for Linux and the second has 4 partitions used for
AmigaDOS.

Thus I have:

   devnum         linux device name
   ------         ------------------------------------
   0x0800         sda  (the entire disk at target 5 : BE CAREFUL)
   0x0801         sda1 (1st partition on disk at target 5)
   0x0802         sda2 (2nd partition on disk at target 5)
   0x0803         sda3 (3rd partition on disk at target 5)
   0x0810         sdb  (the entire disk at target 6 : BE CAREFUL)
   0x0811         sdb1 (1st partition on disk at target 6)
   0x0812         sdb2 (2nd partition on disk at target 6)
   0x0813         sdb3 (3rd partition on disk at target 6)
   0x0814         sdb4 (4th partition on disk at target 6)

My Linux root partition is on the 2nd partition of my first drive, so
I boot with:

  bootstrap -b 0x0802

After booting from one of the above methods, if the kernel supports
your SCSI driver, you should be able to create a minix file system on
one of your hard disk partitions if you wish.  

Determine the size of your partition in 1K blocks (take the number of
512 byte sectors from HDToolBox and divide by two), and determine
which special file to use in /dev (see above).  *DOUBLE CHECK* that
the major/minor numbers for the special device (ls -l /dev/xxx) are
correct.  If they are incorrect or the device special file doesn't
exist, use mknod to change or create the device special file.  Then
execute:

   /etc/mkfs /dev/xxxx size

This will create a minix file system on the hard disk partition.  You
can then mount this partition under /mnt and copy files to it:

  /etc/mount /dev/xxxx /mnt

When finished copying, unmount the partition:

  /etc/umount /mnt

sync a few times, and then reboot.  You can then boot the kernel by
providing "bootstrap" with the device number to boot from.

Again, you do any mucking around with hard disks at your OWN RISK.  I
bought a separate hard disk to use solely for linux before I began
playing with hard disk drivers and file systems for safety purposes.

DEBUGGING NOTE: The early stages of the kernel startup will send out
characters to the serial port to indicate how far it gets.  The serial
port is set to 9600 baud, 8 bits, one stop bit.  You'll need a NULL
modem to hook it up to a terminal.  The code should assert DTR.

Path: gmd.de!newsserver.jvnc.net!darwin.sura.net!news-feed-2.peachnet.edu!
concert!corpgate!nmerh207!bmerha64.bnr.ca!fwpnews!hamish
From: Hamish.Macdon...@bnr.ca (Hamish Macdonald)
Newsgroups: comp.unix.amiga
Subject: Linux/68k Milestone
Date: 1 Dec 1993 14:31:16 GMT
Organization: I speak for nobody but myself
Lines: 15
Distribution: world
Message-ID: <2di9rk$deh@bmerha64.bnr.ca>
NNTP-Posting-Host: bcarh5d2.bnr.ca

I compiled Linux/68k 0.06pl1 under Linux/68k 0.06pl2 last night using
gcc-2.5.5 (m68k-linux).

I then copied the resulting kernel executable over to AmigaDOS and
booted with it.

It booted up fine, ran /etc/init, mounted all my minix filesystems,
the AmigaDOS partition that I mount from Linux, and ran /etc/getty and
/bin/login.  Unfortunately, at that point it hit another kernel bug
that I've already fixed in 0.06pl2 related to sockets (and their
non-implementation).

I consider this a major milestone.

(I will compile 0.06pl2 under Linux when I next get a chance).

			   USENET Archives


The materials and information included in this website may only be used
for purposes such as criticism, review, private study, scholarship, or 
research.


Electronic mail:			      WorldWideWeb:
   tech-insider@outlook.com		         http://tech-insider.org/