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From: RMS%mit...@sri-unix.UUCP
Newsgroups: net.unix-wizards
Subject: Severe complaints against GNU?
Message-ID: <12452@sri-arpa.UUCP>
Date: Fri, 7-Oct-83 18:29:07 EDT
Article-I.D.: sri-arpa.12452
Posted: Fri Oct  7 18:29:07 1983
Date-Received: Tue, 18-Oct-83 01:29:14 EDT
Lines: 52

It's interesting to hear the claim that my free competition
is "destroying the work of everybody else".

We hear great praise of the entrepreneur for his willingness
to take a risk.  This is supposedly why he deserves to make money.

But if it looks like his risk might fail, he always starts
complaining!  It's an amusing contrast.  Businessmen love competition
when they are winning, but not when they are out-competed.  Then the
competition is "destroying their business".

So here we have a person who clearly programs primarily to make money.
But now he is faced with a competitor who decided to charge a lower
price (nothing, in fact), and the market doesn't think his product is
worth the price any more.  Good for the market!  Capitalism doesn't
say he is entitled to find any customers.

In this light, his message is really an attempt to start a
programmers' cartel.  "Please don't work for free because then we will
make less money.  Let's all unite and keep our prices high."

But I'm not joining.  Without me, the cartel probably won't succeed.
I'd rather see the government make people pay for programming through
taxes than a cartel make people pay to buy programs, because at least
the government would let everybody copy the results.

You can view my request for donations as an attempt to organize
the victims of the programmers' cartel, to help them resist.
Like the various measures that the oil-importing countries took
to resist OPEC: conservation and better use of their own resources.

If it does happen that there is difficulty in getting market
acceptance for an unfree operating system once GNU exists, perhaps
that is just.  Operating systems will have to compete on terms of
availability as well as technical features.  Perhaps an operating
system that is technically superior but not free is not really an
improvement over one that is free.  I will be pleased if the market
thinks so; and a capitalist has no grounds to object to the market's
decision.

Technical improvements will still happen.  I will not stop
with GNU, and the rest of you need not do so either.  Rich men will
still support research, just as they do now, and so will hardware
manufacturers, and so will the government.

Furthermore, it should be noted that commercial conservatism is
a strong force against innovation.  New ideas can be marketed
but it's hard for them to gain acceptance, especially when it costs
a lot to try them out.  If the operating system isn't seen
as a product, this difficulty may get less.  Why not give the new
improved system a try, if it's free?
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From: RMS%mit...@sri-unix.UUCP
Newsgroups: net.unix-wizards
Subject: Question to think about.
Message-ID: <12454@sri-arpa.UUCP>
Date: Sat, 8-Oct-83 04:06:27 EDT
Article-I.D.: sri-arpa.12454
Posted: Sat Oct  8 04:06:27 1983
Date-Received: Tue, 18-Oct-83 01:19:59 EDT
Lines: 9

Of the operating systems that you think are widely used or influential or
interesting, which ones were started with the specific goal of making
a profitable software package?

Of the same operating systems, which ones do you like?

Suggested list to start with: Tenex/Twenex, Unix, Multics, ITS, VMS,
CP/M, OS/360, RT-11, RSX-11, GCOS, VM-360 (CP-67), WAITS.
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		       SCO Files Lawsuit Against IBM

March 7, 2003 - The SCO Group filed legal action against IBM in the State 
Court of Utah for trade secrets misappropriation, tortious interference, 
unfair competition and breach of contract. The complaint alleges that IBM 
made concentrated efforts to improperly destroy the economic value of 
UNIX, particularly UNIX on Intel, to benefit IBM's Linux services 
business. See SCO vs IBM.

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