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Relay-Version: version B 2.10 5/3/83; site utzoo.UUCP
Path: utzoo!linus!philabs!mcnc!rti-sel!scirtp!dfh
From: dfh@scirtp.UUCP (David F. Hinnant)
Newsgroups: net.text,net.unix
Subject: eqn on a Diablo 630: Yuk!
Message-ID: <576@scirtp.UUCP>
Date: Sun, 25-May-86 17:37:45 EDT
Article-I.D.: scirtp.576
Posted: Sun May 25 17:37:45 1986
Date-Received: Mon, 26-May-86 23:14:42 EDT
Distribution: net
Organization: SCI Systems, Research Triangle Park, NC
Lines: 27
Xref: linus net.text:999 net.unix:7270

I need to generate some sensible eqn output on a Diablo 630.  Can this 
even be done?  I'm using "neqn" which may or may not be standard System III
or System V, I don't know. I'm using INTERACTIVE's "IN/ix" port.  The manual
page says neqn is for nroff and eqn is for troff.  Other documents indicate
that neqn works on some devices, but the 630 is not mentioned.

Actually, I get something relatively useful for output as long as the equation
doesn't use greek letters.  Square roots are OK, and a limit looks pretty
good, comparatively speaking.  Greek characters don't generate - and I don't
expect them to on my current printwheel.  If I want a Sigma, I get a "R".  
Pi comes out as a "C", Rho as a "K".  The Integral sign is a "^".  Each of
these is preceeded with a control-N which is the ASCII "so" (shift out?)

Now, what should I expect to happen?  Are there some printers that will stop
and allow you to change printwheels?  I looked in a printwheel catalog ate
the "general scientific" wheel which has everything I need.  However, the
daisy petals don't match.  I.e., the "R" isn't the same petal position as
the Sigma.  Is the control-N an escape for some printers/terminals that
does something useful?

Any suggestions?


-- 
				David Hinnant
				SCI Systems, Inc.
				...{decvax, akgua}!mcnc!rti-sel!scirtp!dfh

Relay-Version: version B 2.10 5/3/83; site utzoo.UUCP
Path: utzoo!linus!philabs!mcnc!rti-sel!scirtp!dfh
From: dfh@scirtp.UUCP (David F. Hinnant)
Newsgroups: net.text
Subject: neqn and diablo solution (?)
Message-ID: <587@scirtp.UUCP>
Date: Sat, 14-Jun-86 16:11:26 EDT
Article-I.D.: scirtp.587
Posted: Sat Jun 14 16:11:26 1986
Date-Received: Sun, 15-Jun-86 04:23:32 EDT
Distribution: net
Organization: SCI Systems, Research Triangle Park, NC
Lines: 50


 Thanks to all who responded to my problem concerning neqn and the 
diablo 630.  First, the correct way to do what I want to do is to use
the 450 terminal description:

  (1)	neqn foo.mm | nroff -T450 | lpr

My problem is that under our version of UNIX (INTERACTIVE Systems
"IN/ix"), the diablo printer spooler mechanism "knows" about the default
Teletype escape sequences and converts them automagicly to diablo
escape sequences.  This means that normally when I say:

  (2)	neqn foo.mm | nroff | lpr

I get reasonable output on the diablo (super and sub scripts), but no
simulated greek characters.

Because the diablo printer driver "back end" "knows" about the old
Teletype 37 (I think that's the right number), it somehow munges the 
diablo escape sequences I get by (1), and I get nonsense for output.

Options I considered:

  a) Use a different "back end" driver.

I read the INtext documentation and couldn't easily see how to turn off
the Teletype translation.

  b) Hook the printer up to a spare port and send the file directly
without using a "back end".

This is easier said than done.  The 630 is set for EOB/ACK 
protocol which the "back end" uses.  Changing the dip switches to
start/stop is no easy task, and I would have to do it every time I want
to generate output, and then change them back. The switches are on the
main circuit board, well hidden from easy access.

My appeal:

Can someone at INTERACTIVE or someone who uses IN/ix tell me how to tell
the "back end" driver NOT to try to interpret the control codes in the
print file to Teletype codes, but let them go on by?  This way I could
have a different "back end" option and use the existing printer/back end
configuration.


-- 
				David Hinnant
				SCI Systems, Inc.
				...{decvax, akgua}!mcnc!rti-sel!scirtp!dfh

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