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OKEEFFE.BERKELEY.EDU!karels
From: kar...@OKEEFFE.BERKELEY.EDU (Mike Karels)
Newsgroups: comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject: release of updated network sources for 4.3BSD
Message-ID: <8804041958.AA24282@okeeffe.Berkeley.EDU>
Date: 4 Apr 88 19:58:52 GMT
Sender: dae...@ucbvax.BERKELEY.EDU
Organization: The Internet
Lines: 117

The long-promised release of updated IP/TCP and XNS sources for 4.3BSD
and related systems is now available for anonymous FTP from
ucbarpa.Berkeley.EDU.  The complete source is also being posted to the
"official" 4.3BSD bug fix newsgroup.  The README file for the update is
attached below, and lists the files that comprise the release.  Note that
sites with 4.3BSD source do not require all of these files; one file
contains only unmodified 4.3BSD sources.

For those of you who found the previous files on ucbarpa (placed there
for various testers), note that the release was updated and installed
*today*, April 4.

At some time later in the year, we intend to provide a networking release
that includes these sources as well as network client and server programs
and library files.  That release will be made under a new license agreement
that does not require any AT&T UN*X license; the new license will allow
redistribution and other uses, provided that due credit is given
the University as usual.

		Mike


==============================================================================

This is the description of a release of updated networking software
for the 4.3BSD distribution from the University of California, Berkeley.
These changes are part of the current Berkeley operating system and
will be included in future tape releases.  This release is being
made available by anonymous FTP from the ARPANET and on the Usenet
newsgroup comp.bugs.4bsd.ucb-fixes.

The major changes in this release are in the TCP send policy.
Because the improvements in the send policy could significantly
reduce congestion on the ARPANET and the NSFNET, all sites with
direct or indirect connections to long-haul nets are urged to upgrade
as quickly as possible.  Vendors supplying TCP products based on 4.2BSD
or 4.3BSD are strongly urged to update as quickly as possible.  Vendors
using other TCP implementations should consider the use of the new algorithms
as well, and may find the current Berkeley source code useful as a guide
to their implementation.

The FTP release consists of five files: tcp.tar, inet.tar, netns.tar,
socket.tar and imp.tar.  They are all present on host ucbarpa.Berkeley.EDU
in the directory pub/4.3.  (Each is also available in compressed form,
indicated by a trailing ".Z".)  Each archive file includes a copy of this
file (called README).

The first file, tcp.tar, contains sources for the current version of TCP,
including the slow start algorithm and other work by Van Jacobson of LBL
and a retransmission timer algorithm suggested by Phil Karn.  It is designed
to replace the 4.3BSD TCP, although it also has #ifdef's for installation
in a 4.2-based system (including SunOS versions up to 3.6).  The changes made
since the release of 4.3 dramatically improve performance over slow and/or
lossy networks such as the ARPANET/Milnet and Satnet, and also reduce the
number of unnecessary retransmissions nearly to zero.  Performance on
fast, local-area networks is also somewhat improved, especially on faster
processors when larger buffers are used.  Several new bug fixes have
also been made.  The file TCP_INSTALL contains some hints on configuring
TCP for systems other than standard 4.3BSD and 4.2BSD.

The second file, inet.tar, contains sources for IP, ICMP, UDP and common
internet code (all of the netinet directory except the TCP sources).
It also includes a few files from the sys and h directories that have
been changed since the 4.3BSD release.  There are changes in the processing
of IP record-route and timestamp options and in handling of certain broadcast
UDP requests.  The mbuf allocation routines include a fix for a race and
changes to call the protocol drain routines when appropriate, and will
no longer panic when new allocation requests discover that the mbuf map
has been exhausted.  A recent problem in the code for fragmenting IP packets
with options is fixed.  The complete source for the netstat program is also
included in inet.tar.  It will be usable only on 4.3BSD systems without
modification.  (Note: there are two versions of main.c and host.c in
the netstat directory.  Unless you are installing the new imp code,
you must use main.c.oldimp and host.c.oldimp.)

The combination of tcp.tar and inet.tar is sufficient to upgrade a 4.3BSD
system to the current level of IP/TCP.  It is strongly recommended that
4.3BSD sites that are connected to the Internet, directly or indirectly,
as well as 4.3BSD gateway sites, should upgrade as quickly as possible.

The third file, netns.tar, contains the current version of the Xerox NS
protocols from the netns source directory.  The Sequenced Packet Protocol
has modifications similar to those in TCP, as well as several bug fixes.
Sites that use XNS must upgrade it at the same time as TCP, as the old
XNS code used the old tcp_timer.h.

The fourth file, socket.tar, includes the remainder of the socket and generic
network source files.  These files are identical to those in the 4.3BSD
release.  They are provided for completeness for those who do not have access
to the original 4.3BSD sources.  They are not required for installation
of the TCP and other internet fixes in a 4.3BSD system, nor for installation
of the new internet code into most 4.2BSD-derived systems.  They may
be useful for upgrading the socket or network code in a 4.2BSD-derived
system.  We cannot provide any assistance in such upgrades, but we
are interested in hearing about any successful upgrades.

The fifth file, imp.tar, includes recent modifications to the code for
handling an ARPANET/Milnet IMP using an AHIP (1822) interface.  It was not
quite ready for distribution when the rest of the update was finished, and
may not be present in the anonymous FTP area immediately.  If you want
it, check back later or watch for an announcement on the tcp-ip mailing
list.

Note that the Berkeley network source code is *not* public-domain.
However, as it contains no code licensed by AT&T or others, it is owned
by the Regents of the University of California, Berkeley.  It is provided
as-is, without any warranty, for any purpose.  It may be used, modified or
redistributed in source or binary forms, as long as due credit is given
to the University and the University copyright notices are retained.

These sources may be updated from time to time as improvements or additions
are made.  The next update will include support for IP multicast done
by Steve Deering at Stanford.  Updates will be announced on the tcp-ip
mailing list, which is redistributed on Usenet.

	Mike Karels	kar...@Berkeley.EDU
	Van Jacobson	v...@lbl-csam.arpa

Path: utzoo!mnetor!uunet!husc6!mailrus!ames!pasteur!ucbvax!
OKEEFFE.BERKELEY.EDU!karels
From: kar...@OKEEFFE.BERKELEY.EDU (Mike Karels)
Newsgroups: comp.protocols.tcp-ip
Subject: Re: release of updated network sources for 4.3BSD
Message-ID: <8804080401.AA28931@okeeffe.Berkeley.EDU>
Date: 8 Apr 88 04:01:02 GMT
Sender: dae...@ucbvax.BERKELEY.EDU
Organization: The Internet
Lines: 9

How embarassing!  You're quite right about the byte-order problem
in ip_output when fragmenting, and your fix is exactly right.  Curiously,
I tested that between machines with two byte orders, but my home machine
now uses network byte order.  I guess I should go back to vaxen.

The inet.tar files on ucbarpa have been updated with the fix this evening.
(And yes, I tested it *both* ways this time.)

		Mike

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