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Newsgroups: comp.unix.questions,comp.sys.att
Path: sparky!uunet!van-bc!tram!jeffrey
From: jeff...@squid.tram.com (Jeffrey L Bromberger)
Subject: AT&T copywrites BSD code???
Organization: Tramway Unix Systems
Date: Sat, 11 Jan 1992 14:47:24 GMT
Message-ID: <1992Jan11.144724.29983@squid.tram.com>
Followup-To: comp.sys.att
Summary: What is going on here???
Keywords: dumprestore.h
Sender: jeff...@squid.tram.com (Jeffrey L Bromberger)


I while ago, I posted about getting dump(8) and restore(8) from the
Berkeley distributions for System V.  Well, nobody had it, so I decided
to start porting them over.  Right now, only restore is free, but I
figure that dump will soon be also.  So, I start poking around on my
machine looking through the header files.  Kinda without aim at first,
and then I stumbled across this file.  Please note that I cannot post
it's entire contents, but here are the comments from the top:

/*	Copyright (c) 1984 AT&T	*/
/*	  All Rights Reserved  	*/

/*	THIS IS UNPUBLISHED PROPRIETARY SOURCE CODE OF AT&T	*/
/*	The copyright notice above does not evidence any   	*/
/*	actual or intended publication of such source code.	*/

#ident	"@(#)/usr/include/dumprestor..sl 1.1 3.1 12/03/85 42555"
/*	3.0 SID #	1.1	*/

Yup, you guessed it.  /usr/include/protocols/dumprestore.h  Only the
tape parameters have changed, but the structs that define the tape
records are still the same.  Oh, they also removed the magic number
for the old filesystem, daring to call the UFS the "new" one.  I have
no objection to seeing the file there, except for one sticky point.
It is now copywritten by AT&T with *no mention* of UCB or the Regents
of California! I do realize that AT&T (or USL) bought some of the BSD
code (vi for example), but shouldn't it's origin be appropriately noted?
Heck, even I have to keep in the BSD copywrite, so why shouldn't they?
And this was from before SVR4.  In fact, it's dated 12 December 1985.

FYI: this was found in the C-FP+ compiler package for the 3B2.  The
release notes mention that this file will eventually go away.  This
also means that AT&T probably found it worth while to port
dump/restore over to their 3B2 platforms also.

Does anyone at The Labs just wanna hand them over and save me the time
to debug them?  ;-)

j
-- 
Jeffrey L. Bromberger ------- System Manager ------- Tramway Unix Systems
jeff...@squid.tram.com      Anywhere!{ccnysci,limbic,van-bc}!tram!jeffrey

Path: sparky!uunet!europa.asd.contel.com!gatech!psuvax1!hsdndev!
news.bbn.com!ulowell!swlvx2!rayssd!galaxia!dave
From: d...@galaxia.newport.ri.us (David H. Brierley)
Newsgroups: comp.sys.att
Subject: Re: AT&T copywrites BSD code???
Keywords: dumprestore.h
Message-ID: <1992Jan16.034232.14814@galaxia.newport.ri.us>
Date: 16 Jan 92 03:42:32 GMT
References: <1992Jan11.144724.29983@squid.tram.com>
Organization: Dave's Very Own Personal System
Lines: 21

In article <1992Jan11.144724.29...@squid.tram.com> jeff...@squid.tram.com 
(Jeffrey L Bromberger) writes:
>
>and then I stumbled across this file.  Please note that I cannot post
>it's entire contents, but here are the comments from the top:
>
>/*	Copyright (c) 1984 AT&T	*/
>/*	  All Rights Reserved  	*/
>
>/*	THIS IS UNPUBLISHED PROPRIETARY SOURCE CODE OF AT&T	*/

As a general rule, this means that the file in question was originally part
of the code that UCB got from AT&T.  Just because a particular program was
developed at UCB does not mean that parts of it were not derived from
original AT&T code.  Parts of the original vi/ex were derived from AT&T
code.  If you look at the "freed source" files on the "networking" tape
it is not uncommon to find parts of a program but not the whole thing.
-- 
David H. Brierley
Home: d...@galaxia.newport.ri.us; Work: d...@quahog.ssd.ray.com
Send comp.sources.3b1 submissions to comp-sources-...@galaxia.newport.ri.us
%% Can I be excused, my brain is full. **

Newsgroups: comp.sys.att
Path: sparky!uunet!zaphod.mps.ohio-state.edu!van-bc!tram!jeffrey
From: jeff...@squid.tram.com (Jeffrey L Bromberger)
Subject: Re: AT&T copywrites BSD code???
Organization: Tramway Unix Systems
Date: Fri, 17 Jan 1992 09:28:54 GMT
Message-ID: <1992Jan17.092854.15781@squid.tram.com>
Followup-To: poster
Summary: Forgot my history!
Keywords: dumprestore.h
References: <1992Jan11.144724.29983@squid.tram.com> 
<1992Jan16.034232.14814@galaxia.newport.ri.us>

In article <1992Jan16.034232.14...@galaxia.newport.ri.us> 
d...@galaxia.newport.ri.us (David H. Brierley) writes:
>In article <1992Jan11.144724.29...@squid.tram.com> I wrote:
>>
>>and then I stumbled across this file.  Please note that I cannot post
>>it's entire contents, but here are the comments from the top:
>>
>>/*	Copyright (c) 1984 AT&T	*/
>>/*	  All Rights Reserved  	*/
>>
>>/*	THIS IS UNPUBLISHED PROPRIETARY SOURCE CODE OF AT&T	*/
>
>As a general rule, this means that the file in question was originally part
>of the code that UCB got from AT&T.  Just because a particular program was
>developed at UCB does not mean that parts of it were not derived from
>original AT&T code.  Parts of the original vi/ex were derived from AT&T
>code.  If you look at the "freed source" files on the "networking" tape
>it is not uncommon to find parts of a program but not the whole thing.

Indeed, Dave, you are correct.  A kind gentleman from AT&T (who will
remain nameless) send me a note to the effect "have you forgotten
about V7 and/or 32V?"  This is the origin of dump/restor (note the
missing 'e' - sorta like creat() ).  AT&T decided that dump wasn't the
way they wanted to go, so they eventually phased out this header file.

I presume that this copywrite message wasn't in the BSD code since (at
the beginning) you needed a 32V licence (or better) to get it.

For the general information of the crowds, the file
<protocols/dumprestore.h> is now free for distribution from the net-2
tape.

j
-- 
Jeffrey L. Bromberger ------- System Manager ------- Tramway Unix Systems
jeff...@squid.tram.com      Anywhere!{ccnysci,limbic,van-bc}!tram!jeffrey

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