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Path: sparky!uunet!cs.utexas.edu!swrinde!network.ucsd.edu!nic!richter
From: rich...@nic.cerf.net (Adam J. Richter)
Newsgroups: comp.unix.bsd,alt.cd-rom
Subject: 4.4BSD-alpha CDROM
Keywords: cdrom
Message-ID: <2278@nic.cerf.net>
Date: 9 Jul 92 10:18:07 GMT
Followup-To: comp.unix.bsd
Organization: Yggdrasil Computing Infrastructure Corporation
Lines: 40


	CSRG is supposed to release the 4.4-alpha tape in the next
week or so.  To raise money, CSRG is going to charge $1,000 for a
tape, and they've asked a number of major FTP sites not to make the
tape available for a while so that companies will actually buy it.

	On one hand, there seems to be a consensus on this group
that additional funding for CSRG would be money well spent.  On the
other hand, I suspect that there are a lot people who would like
to get the 4.4-alpha distribution, but who cannot justify spending
a thousand dollars for the tape.

	Fortunately, I have a plan.

	My company, Yggdrasil Computing Infrastructure Corp., will
sell a 4.4-alpha CDROM and give CSRG 60% of the sales revenue from
this CDROM until November 1st.  At $100 each, this CDROM will allow
people to contribute to CSRG while, at the same time, getting
something tangible in return.  Maybe I'll thrown in a T-shirt with
deal if I can think of a snappy slogan for it.  In order to avoid
undercutting CSRG, company sites with more than twenty employees
will be required to buy a minimum of 15 CD's.  Hopefully this
should help fund CSRG while reducing the annoyance of not having
4.4-alpha available for FTP.

	At the moment, I plan to make the CDROM simply contain
the compressed tar file of the distribution and a README file.
If there is enough interest I could make an unpacked directory
tree that was compliant with ISO9660 level 2 for non-DOS
machines, but I'd still have to change some of the file names to
make them legal for ISO9660.

	If you have any suggestions or comments about the plan that
I've outlined, send me email.

-- 
Adam J. Richter				409 Evelyn Avenue, Apt. 312
rich...@cerf.net			Albany, CA 94706
					(510)528-3209
Another member of the League for Programming Freedom (lea...@prep.ai.mit.edu).

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From: rich...@nic.cerf.net (Adam J. Richter)
Newsgroups: comp.unix.bsd
Subject: Re: 4.4BSD-alpha CDROM
Keywords: cdrom
Message-ID: <2304@nic.cerf.net>
Date: 10 Jul 92 18:17:57 GMT
References: <2278@nic.cerf.net>
Organization: Yggdrasil Computing Infrastructure Corporation
Lines: 46

In article <2...@nic.cerf.net> rich...@nic.cerf.net I wrote:
>	My company, Yggdrasil Computing Infrastructure Corp., will
>sell a 4.4-alpha CDROM and give CSRG 60% of the sales revenue from
>this CDROM until November 1st.  At $100 each, [...]

	I got 15 responses to this proposal, mostly of the form
"I might buy one."  Since I didn't ask everyone who might be
interested to send me email, the amount of mail that I got suggests
to me that there are a number of people who would find the CDROM useful,
but that there aren't hordes of folks who would buy.

	I think that Yggdrasil stands to lose a lot of money from the
CDROM offer as it stands, so I'm afraid I have to backpedal a bit.

	Yggdrasil will still donate 60% of gross sales for the CDROM
to CSRG, but the price of the 4.4-alpha tape will be deducted from
this donation.  (This moves the estimated break-even point from 72 discs
43 discs.)

	I should mention a few points to demonstrate that the
philanthropic aspect of this project have not been compromised
too much:

	     1. CSRG still starts getting money beyond the $1k for
		the tape long before Yggdrasil breaks even.

	     2. CSRG gets at least $1k for the tape, no matter what
		happens, although I'm obviously betting a lot of
		money that CSRG will get more than just the $1k.

	     3. In a sense, there will still be $60 of CSRG money paired
		to every CDROM purchased.

	     4. The CDROM production costs still come entirely from
		Yggdrasil's 40%.

	This change is necessary in order to make the project
possible.  Otherwise, it would be too likely to lose too much money.

			--Adam

-- 
Adam J. Richter				409 Evelyn Avenue, Apt. 312
rich...@cerf.net			Albany, CA 94706
					(510)528-3209
Another member of the League for Programming Freedom (lea...@prep.ai.mit.edu).

Path: sparky!uunet!ccut!wnoc-tyo-news!cs.titech!titccy.cc.titech!necom830!
mohta
From: mo...@necom830.cc.titech.ac.jp (Masataka Ohta)
Newsgroups: comp.unix.bsd,fj.unix
Subject: Re: 4.4BSD-alpha CDROM
Keywords: cdrom
Message-ID: <1760@titccy.cc.titech.ac.jp>
Date: 11 Jul 92 10:40:29 GMT
References: <2278@nic.cerf.net>
Sender: n...@titccy.cc.titech.ac.jp
Followup-To: comp.unix.bsd
Organization: Tokyo Institute of Technology
Lines: 34

In article <2...@nic.cerf.net>
	rich...@nic.cerf.net (Adam J. Richter) writes:

>	CSRG is supposed to release the 4.4-alpha tape in the next
>week or so.  To raise money, CSRG is going to charge $1,000 for a
>tape, and they've asked a number of major FTP sites not to make the
>tape available for a while so that companies will actually buy it.

On 7/9, at the Conference of Japan UNIX Society, there was a BOF meeting
on BSD issues.

There, Keith Bostic, one of the foreign guests, said full BSD4.4 tape will
be charged $2,000 and could be delivered to those who have 32V or upper
AT&T license, while freely distributable BSD4.4-light, which includes 90%
of full 4.4, will be delivered at $1,000 without any license.

Among the participants of the BOF meeting, there are 35 people who will
willingly pay $1,000 to get a copy of 4.4-light.

Thus, it was decided to first collect money, and send the money to BSD
leaving minimal amount to produce CDROM. Then, after 4.4-light is
released, I receive a copy, add export restricted DES part, create copies
and deliver CDROMs.

As I can produce more copies cheaply, I can sell them worldwide
and send all profit to CSRG.

>	My company, Yggdrasil Computing Infrastructure Corp.,

In which country is your company located?

If you are in US, you can't export anything which includes DES.

						Masataka Ohta

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rutgers!network.ucsd.edu!nic!richter
From: rich...@nic.cerf.net (Adam J. Richter)
Newsgroups: comp.unix.bsd
Subject: Re: 4.4BSD-alpha CDROM
Keywords: cdrom
Message-ID: <2311@nic.cerf.net>
Date: 11 Jul 92 20:00:44 GMT
Article-I.D.: nic.2311
References: <2278@nic.cerf.net> <1760@titccy.cc.titech.ac.jp>
Organization: Yggdrasil Computing Infrastructure Corporation
Lines: 20

In article <1...@titccy.cc.titech.ac.jp> mo...@necom830.cc.titech.ac.jp 
(Masataka Ohta) writes:
>If you are in US, you can't export anything which includes DES.

	On Friday, I had a conference call with the company's outside
counsel and his "export expert" about exporting to Canada.  As I had
heard elsewhere, the regulations have been changed so that password
authentication is no longer considered munitions, at least for the
purpose of exporting to Canada.  You just have to fill out a form
at the post office when you mail the thing.

	I think that the business about password authentication
no longer being considered munitions applies to all exports and
not just exports to Canada, but I'll try to get an authoritative
answer on Monday.

-- 
Adam J. Richter				409 Evelyn Avenue, Apt. 312
rich...@cerf.net			Albany, CA 94706
					(510)528-3209
Another member of the League for Programming Freedom (lea...@prep.ai.mit.edu).

Newsgroups: comp.unix.bsd
Path: sparky!uunet!elroy.jpl.nasa.gov!ames!pasteur!hermes.Berkeley.EDU!bostic
From: bos...@hermes.Berkeley.EDU (Keith Bostic)
Subject: Re: 4.4BSD-alpha CDROM
Message-ID: <1992Jul13.232742.11206@pasteur.Berkeley.EDU>
Keywords: cdrom
Sender: n...@pasteur.Berkeley.EDU (NNTP Poster)
Nntp-Posting-Host: hermes.berkeley.edu
Organization: University of California at Berkeley
References: <2278@nic.cerf.net> <1760@titccy.cc.titech.ac.jp>
Date: Mon, 13 Jul 1992 23:27:42 GMT
Lines: 33

In article <1...@titccy.cc.titech.ac.jp> mo...@necom830.cc.titech.ac.jp
(Masataka Ohta) writes:
>In article <2...@nic.cerf.net>
>	rich...@nic.cerf.net (Adam J. Richter) writes:
>
>>	CSRG is supposed to release the 4.4-alpha tape in the next
>>week or so.  To raise money, CSRG is going to charge $1,000 for a
>>tape, and they've asked a number of major FTP sites not to make the
>>tape available for a while so that companies will actually buy it.
>
>On 7/9, at the Conference of Japan UNIX Society, there was a BOF meeting
>on BSD issues.
>
>There, Keith Bostic, one of the foreign guests, said full BSD4.4 tape will
>be charged $2,000 and could be delivered to those who have 32V or upper
>AT&T license, while freely distributable BSD4.4-light, which includes 90%
>of full 4.4, will be delivered at $1,000 without any license.

Unfortunately, our original plan of distributing the 4.4BSD alpha
tape in both USL licensed and freely redistributable forms (4.4BSD-Lite
alpha) is not going to be possible.  The University has decided that
further "administrative review" of 4.4BSD-Lite alpha is necessary
before it can be released.  This means that the various efforts to
make it available on CDROM will have to be postponed.

We confidently expect that the final distribution will be available
in the two forms, as we have previously stated.  Additionally, if the
administrative review is completed quickly we will release 4.4BSD-Lite
alpha as well.

Keith Bostic
Kirk McKusick

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