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From: burg...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil (Dave Burgess)
Newsgroups: comp.os.386bsd.announce,comp.os.386bsd.questions
Subject: FAQ_01. First Draft.
Followup-To: comp.os.386bsd.questions
Date: 3 Apr 1993 19:17:53 -0800
Organization: University of California, Berkeley
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NNTP-Posting-Host: agate.berkeley.edu



Section 1. (General Network Information)
General information

This section of the FAQ is about the electronic support network that
exists for 386bsd.  

1.0 What is 386BSD? (Taken from the INSTALL.NOTES)

     Welcome to 386BSD Release 0.1, the second edition of the 386BSD 
operating system created by William and Lynne Jolitz.  Like its 
predecessor, 386BSD Release 0.0, Release 0.1 comprises an entire and 
complete UNIX-like operating system for the 80386/80486-based AT i
Personal Computer.

   386BSD Release 0.1 is an enhanced version of the original release done 
by William F. Jolitz, the developer of 386BSD.  386BSD Release 0.0 was 
based on the Networking Software, Release 2 from the University of 
California at Berkeley EECS Department, and included much of the 386BSD
work done earlier by Bill and contributed by us to the University. The 
latest release, 386BSD Release 0.1, contains new work by the developer 
and many new items which have been freely contributed by other software 
developers for incorporation into 386BSD (see the file CONTRIB.LIST).
These contributions have increased the functionality and made it more 
robust.  As a courtesy to the developer and the many people who have 
generously contributed these software enhancements, we request that 
users abide by and properly maintain all attributions, copyrights, and 
copylefts contained within this release.

     386BSD is intended to foster new research and development in 
operating systems and networking technology by providing this base 
technology in a broadly accessible manner.  As such, like its 
predecessor, 386BSD Release 0.1 is freely redistributable and modifiable.

1.1 Feature summary

386BSD Release 0.1 is intended to be widely used by those interested in 
"pushing the envelope" towards the formation and development of innovative 
ideas in computer technology.  As such, we have spent considerable time 
developing a system which is simple to partition and install and emphasizes 
stability and completeness.

The objective of this release is to allow anyone interested to quickly 
obtain and install 386BSD, so that the time is spent using the system and 
not on arcane system administrative details.

Among the many features of 386BSD:

*    New "Tiny 386BSD" System Installation Floppy

*    Simplified installation procedures.

*    386BSD partitioning for use on an MS-DOS system.

*    Compressed, multivolume CPIO dump format binary/source/other 
     distribution sets on MS-DOS floppies.

*    387 emulation.

*    SCSI support.

*    CD-ROM support.

*    NFS, TCP/IP and full networking.

*    New 386BSD "Fix-It" System Maintenance Floppy.

*    New "Additional User Software" MS-DOS floppy dump.

We hope that while you browse through 386BSD Release 0.1, you will take a 
moment to look at the CONTRIB.LIST file to see the many people who have 
made this release possible.

1.2 The future of 386BSD.

Forecasting the future is always a tricky business.  There is work underway
to implement version 0.2 of 386bsd.  In addition, many people are involved
in a project to put together a 386bsd version 0.1.5, which will be a 
complete distribution set including all relevent patches and updates to
new versions of many of the software packages that are currently available.

Here is the Future of 386bsd as seen by Bill and Lynne Jolitz (from the 
INSTALL.NOTES).

The Future of 386BSD: It's up to You

     386BSD Release 0.0 has met with tremendous enthusiasm and support, and 
we hope that 386BSD Release 0.1, a stable robust version of 386BSD with 
enhanced functionality, will allow more people to try 386BSD.

     But ironically, the very success of 386BSD has made it impossible for 
us to continue doing out-of-pocket personal releases.  Complete releases 
such as we are doing are demanding, time-consuming, and expensive. It has 
been most frustrating to us that while the vision, the will, the experience, 
and the leadership are all present, the practical constraints have become 
too great for us to ignore.

     Over the course of these releases, many people have become confused as 
to what 386BSD actually is. As such, we feel is important to underscore the 
basic differences between a commercial release and a research release such as
386BSD. While both are extremely costly to develop, engineer, and release, 
they actually have very different agendas.

     Commercial releases efforts are defined by well established customer 
demands, prior product releases, and (occasionally) strategic marketing 
directions. In addition, if something needs to be added, it can be 
"tossed in" to satisfy immediate needs (the old "give the customer what he
thinks he wants" mentality).  Long-term objectives are generally given 
short shrift.

     Unlike commercial releases, releases targeted to the research and 
educational communities are much more demanding in that the developer must 
possess a broad understanding of long-term technological trends and 
objectives and incorporate them into each release, while still maintaining 
functionality.  As a consequence, research releases and new work are 
generally done only under the appropriate supervision and auspices of a 
well-funded University project.

     However, we have discovered that any group selected to shape these 
releases must demonstrate leadership, vision, good judgment, and a devotion 
to ethical behavior in all their dealings.  A development group chosen merely 
on the basis of convenience and cynicism (i.e. a "political" solution) will 
result in the immediate desecration of these goals.

     If new research directions are to be fully explored and developed 
using 386BSD, then 386BSD itself must evolve.  These first two releases, 
historic though they may be, are just the beginning of this process, and 
not an end in themselves.

     Over the course of our 386BSD series in DDJ, we have occasionally 
touched upon many areas of new technology with which 386BSD and other 
UNIX-like operating systems must contend, such as symmetric multiprocessing, 
multimedia applications, and gigabit networks. We are fully aware of
how to focus 386BSD to head in these directions, and we have spoken to many 
others in the research community who want to work on and share in this vision.

     However, if the benefits which 386BSD offers are to be "claimed" by the 
entire research and educational community, the costs must be borne by all of 
us as well.

     Quite frankly, if 386BSD is to have any future, it will require 
considerable resources and assistance, as well as the continued goodwill and 
enthusiasm of its user base.  Your interest, involvement, and support of 
386BSD and its goals will ultimately determine the future of 386BSD and 
successive releases.

1.3 386BSD software projects in progress

The list os software projects in progress is just too volatile to go into a
static document like the FAQ.  Suffice it to say, if there is something
you want to do using 386bsd; ask first to see what has been done.

1.3.1 Contacting software authors

Whenever you are working on a port of a software package, it is always a
good idea to contact the original author and offer whatever changes
you needed to make in order to port the software.  That way, subsequent
releases of the package may include changes that allow all users of
386bsd the advantage of reusing your work over and over.

1.4 Minimum hardware configuration recommended

There has been considerable debate about what the REAL minimum configuration
for 386bsd is.  Some would claim that it is the smallest computer that an
installation will succeed on.  Other claim that it is the smallest usable
computer (based on RAM and speed constraints) and other would claim that it
should be based on using 'X'-windows.

For specific hardware, see Section 8.

The smallest installable platform is an 80386, using a VGA card, with at least
2Meg of RAM and a 42 Megabyte hard disk.  While not all SCSI cards (especially
EISA) are supported, a great many are either in the base distribution or
through patches.  See section 8 for more details.

Personnaly, I would like to see a smaller 'minimum', but hey, I just maintain 
the FAQ.

1.5 Where to get the source and binarys
1.5.1 Forms available (floppy, FTP, CDROM)

386bsd is available in just about every format known to man, with the
possible exception os stone tablets and apayrus.

1.5.1.1 Where can I get the distribution on floppy or tape?

Many people will copy files onto diskettes or tapes if you coordinate it
with them ahead of time.  In addition, many companies offer 386bsd on
various types of media for money.  

Note that there are virtually no restictions on distributing the 386bsd 
distributions.  Basically, wherever you can find it, you can get it.

1.5.1.2 Where can I get the distribution via FTP?

The files you should look for specifically when using FTP are directories
called srcdist, bindist, and etcdist.  These directories will hold the
files for each of the distributions.  Once you have received the files
via FTP, you can either load them directly onto your system and then unarchive
them using 'extract' or one of the other methods suggested in Section 2
of the FAQ.

The list of sites that have 386BSD is cover in section 1.8 below.

1.5.1.3 Where can I get the distribution on CD ROM?

This answer is out of date.  New information will be available soon.

1.6 Electronic Information Groups for 386BSD
1.6.1 Usenet newsgroups

comp.os.386bsd.announce 
 Announcements relating to the 386bsd operating system. (Moderated)
 Announcements should be mailed to cgd using the address
 "386bsd-annou...@agate.berkeley.edu".
comp.os.386bsd.apps
 Applications which run under 386bsd.
comp.os.386bsd.bugs
 Bugs and fixes for the 386bsd OS and its clients.
comp.os.386bsd.development
 Working on 386bsd internals.
comp.os.386bsd.misc
 General aspects of 386bsd not covered by other groups.
comp.os.386bsd.questions
 General questions about 386bsd.

1.6.2 Newsgroup archives.

There is a newsgroup archive in Australia.  See the regular posting in 
comp.os.386bsd.announce for details.  Other archive sites are probably
available.  

1.6.3 Other electronic resources.

There are many bulletin boards throughout the world that have 386bsd 
software and information available.  There are also Internet mailing lists
available, although I don't have the names available at my fingertips.
Also, there are Compuserve and other On-Line services that have 386bsd
discussions.

1.7 Documentation available

There are two types of documentation for 386bsd.  First is the set that
covers the operation and theory used in BSD-Unix.  These sources are
often excellent for background and understanding of the current implementation
of 386bsd.  Second, the set of manuals written specifically for 386bsd.  Most
of these are books anbd magazine articles written by Bill and Lynne Jolitz.

1.7.1 BSD manuals

The full set of BSD documentation is available via anonymous FTP from
ocf.berkeley.edu in /pub/Library/Computer/doc4.3.  To print this 
documentation on 386bsd systems, replace the ditroff references in the
Makefile with 'groff -e -t -msU {SRC} >out.ps' to generate PostScript
format files.  Use different options to make the output conform to other
print styles.

The etc distribution also comes with a documentation directory
~/share/doc which has nearly 3Meg of documentation about 386bsd.

1.7.2 BSD books (from the INSTALL.NOTES)

1.   For a good general presentation on UNIX system  design,
     we recommend  Maurice J. Bach's "The Design of the UNIX
     Operating System" (Prentice-Hall Software Series,  1986,
     471pp).   Although it is now obsolete in some areas, it
     still provides the best discussion of key system  areas
     such as the buffer cache.

2.   For a more theoretical viewpoint of  operating  systems
     design, we suggest Per Brinch Hansen's "Operating System
     Principles" (Prentice-Hall Series in Automatic  Computa-
     tion, 1973, 366pp).

3.   For an understanding of  the  roots  of  all  UNIX-like
     operating systems,   one should  obtain  Elliot  I.
     Organick's "The Multics System: An Examination  of Its
     Structure" (MIT Press, 1972, 392 pp).

4.   Of course, every serious student  of  computer  science
     should  have Donald E. Knuth's three-volume set "The Art
     of Computer Programming" (Addison-Wesley Series in Com-
     puter Science and Information Processing, 1975).

5.   "The UNIX Time-Sharing System" by D.M. Ritchie and K.
     Thompson, Communications of  the ACM, 17, No. 7 (July
     1974). This is the classic paper  on  the UNIX  system
     which  (we feel) set the tone for all future work with
     UNIX-like systems:

	The success of UNIX lies not so much in new inventions 
	but rather in the full exploitation of a carefully 
	selected set of fertile ideas, and especially in showing 
	that they can be keys to the implementation of a small 
	yet powerful operating system

6.   On the 386-side, it's best to go to  the  source, with
     John  H.  Crawford and Patrick P. Gelsinger's book 
     "Programming the 80386" (Sybex, 1987, 773pp). There are 
     many other 386/486 books available as well.

     For general information on how-to-use  UNIX-like systems, C++, GNU 
software, and so forth, there are a number of good books available from 
any technical bookstore, with more arriving daily.  In addition, an 
on-line manual is available (in the binary distribution set).  It 
contains specific information on the use of UNIX utilities and commands. 
Type "man man" for information on the online manual.

1.7.3 The Jolitz Book

Bill and Lynne Jolitz are writing a book about 386bsd.  It will be announced
once it is ready.  A tentative date of late 1992 was once offered, but since
it is early 1993 and no book has been announced, we can assume that it will
be later than the original estimate.
 
1.7.4 Dr Dobbs journal

For users who wish to understand the internals of the 386BSD system 
developed by William F. Jolitz from 1989 to the present, the most 
immediate and available reference is our feature series entitled 
"Porting UNIX to the 386", appearing in Dr. Dobbs Journal, USA 
(January 1991 to July 1992) and UNIX Magazine, Germany (June 1991 
to present). For inquiries on the article series (including reprints), 
contact the magazines for information.

1.7.5 Other FAQ's on the net that are relevant

There are many FAQs that can be used in conjunction with 386bsd.  These 
include the FAQs for all of the GNU software, the different shells that are
available, the programming languages that are available, and many more.
In addition, many programs have their own FAQ which should be referenced
whenever that package is being added.  Prime examples of the latter are
the FAQs for elm and innd.
 
The observant reader will notice that there is no 'X' questions in this
FAQ.  The XFree386 FAQ is posted regularly to comp.os.386bsd.*.  There is
no good reason to include any 'X' questions in this FAQ, with the exception
of the most basic 'Where can I get the 'X' FAQ'.

Most FAQs are available by anonymous FTP from rtfm.{somewhere} and via
News in news.answers and/or comp.answers.

1.8 FTP sites for 386BSD

A standard tool for finding files is 'archie'.  Searching the
archie archive for 386BSD yields the following list.  Searching
for 386bsd will also yield a long list of sites.

Host agate.berkeley.edu (128.32.136.1)

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Feb 27 18:04  386BSD

Host animal-farm.nevada.edu

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Jul 17 1992  386BSD

Host archive.afit.af.mil

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Aug 19 21:55  386BSD

Host ascwide.ascii.co.jp

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x       2048  Jan 19 10:13  386BSD

Host athene.uni-paderborn.de

    Location: /uninstalled
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Aug 17 12:33  386BSD

Host bode.ee.ualberta.ca

    Location: /pub/OS
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Aug 14 00:00  386BSD
 
Host bruno.cs.colorado.edu

    Location: /pub/cs/distribs/eli
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x        512  Jan 11 23:07  386BSD
    Location: /pub/cs/doc/usl.vs.bsd/unigram
           FILE -rw-r--r--       4423  Aug  6 00:00  386BSD

Host capella.eetech.mcgill.ca (132.206.1.17)

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY dr-xrwxr-x        512  Apr  1 1992  386BSD

Host chook.cs.adelaide.edu.au

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Oct  8 12:32  386BSD
    Location: /pub/XFree86-1.1
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Oct  7 11:02  386BSD

Host cs.ubc.ca

    Location: /mirror3
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Aug  4 14:12  386BSD

Host delbruck.pharm.sunysb.edu

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Dec  5 17:34  386BSD

Host f.ms.uky.edu (128.163.128.6)

    Location: /incoming
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxrwx        512  Jun  3 1992  386BSD
    Location: /pub2
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x       1024  Feb  9 03:28  386BSD

Host ftp.cs.uni-sb.de

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Aug 13 00:00  386BSD

Host ftp.denet.dk

    Location: /pub/OS
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Feb  9 17:49  386BSD

Host gatekeeper.dec.com (16.1.0.2)

    Location: /.9/plan/eli
      DIRECTORY dr-xr-xr-x        512  Feb 15 03:30  386BSD

Host goya.dit.upm.es

    Location: /info/unix
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Aug 28 16:03  386BSD

Host isfs.kuis.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    Location: /BSD
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x       1024  Nov 15 03:10  386BSD
    Location: /ftpmail/ftp.ascii.co.jp/pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Sep 23 22:31  386BSD
    Location: /ftpmail/ftp.cs.keio.ac.jp/pub/os
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Nov 11 01:41  386BSD
    Location: /ftpmail/ftp.mei.co.jp/free
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Dec  4 02:41  386BSD
    Location: /ftpmail/theta.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Oct 27 22:56  386BSD

Host jhunix.hcf.jhu.edu

    Location: /pub/publicomainoftware
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Feb 13 02:31  386BSD

Host kirk.bu.oz.au (131.244.1.1)

    Location: /pub/OS
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Sep 24 10:39  386BSD

Host math.orst.edu (128.193.16.60)

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Jan 14 09:38  386BSD

Host math12.mathematik.uni-bielefeld.de

    Location: /pub/ibmc
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Jan 14 16:22  386BSD

Host mcshh.hanse.de

    Location: /pub/systeme
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x         80  Nov  5 01:12  386BSD

Host minnie.zdv.uni-mainz.de

    Location: /pub0/pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Nov  5 12:30  386BSD

Host plains.nodak.edu

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x        512  Jan 21 17:24  386BSD

Host plan9.njit.edu

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwx------        512  Mar 18 1992  386BSD

Host pprg.eece.unm.edu

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Mar 28 1992  386BSD

Host procyon.cis.ksu.edu

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Jan  4 02:13  386BSD

Host quepasa.cs.tu-berlin.de

    Location: /pub/os
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x        512  Dec 14 16:43  386BSD

Host reseq.regent.e-technik.tu-muenchen.de

    Location: /informatik.public/comp/os/bsd
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x        512  Jan 26 19:50  386BSD

Host rs3.hrz.th-darmstadt.de

    Location: /pub/os
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x        512  Nov 28 04:11  386BSD

Host sifon.cc.mcgill.ca

    Location: /pub/packages
      DIRECTORY dr-xr-xr-x        512  Feb 14 12:35  386BSD

Host sun0.urz.uni-heidelberg.de

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Jan  3 18:29  386BSD

Host switek.uni-muenster.de

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x        512  Jan 27 08:29  386BSD

Host theta.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    Location: /
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x        512  Dec 25 14:27  386BSD

Host unix.hensa.ac.uk

    Location: /pub/uunet/languages/eli
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Jan 29 04:56  386BSD
    Location: /pub/uunet/systems/unix
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Jan 14 10:15  386BSD

Host walhalla.germany.eu.net

    Location: /pub/comp/i386
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x        512  May 29 1992  386BSD

Host walton.maths.tcd.ie

    Location: /src
      DIRECTORY drwxr-xr-x        512  Jan 28 15:17  386BSD

Host wnoc-fuk.wide.ad.jp

    Location: /pub
      DIRECTORY drwxrwxr-x        512  Jan 25 16:38  386BSD


The code may also soon to be available, or perhaps already available,
from both CompuServe and BIX.

1.8.2 Official distribution sites

As far as can be determined, agate.berkeley.edu and its 'mirror' sites are
the only official distribution site.

1.8.3 Reference sites

For a brief period, ref.tfs.com was available for use as a reference system.
This system was used as the testbed for many programs that were ported to
386bsd by many authors.  Unfortunately, ref.tfs.com has been disabled as
a reference system.  Once a replacement is established, it will be noted
here.

1.8.4 Unofficial archive sites that have neat stuff!

There are many sites that have things which have eihter been ported to
386bsd or are available to the world.  Use archie to find these sites, or 
read comp.os.386bsd.* for more information.

1.8.5 Why shouldn't I get my distribution from UUNet?

UUNET has a policy against binaries, so you won't be able to boot up if you 
do download it.  This makes getting started impossible, and generally creates 
more trouble than it solves.  Use 'archie' or the list above to get
REAL distributions.

Path: gmd.de!newsserver.jvnc.net!howland.reston.ans.net!agate!agate.berkeley.edu!cgd
From: c...@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU (Chris G. Demetriou)
Newsgroups: comp.os.386bsd.questions
Subject: Re: FAQ_01. First Draft.
Followup-To: comp.os.386bsd.questions
Date: 3 Apr 93 19:33:40
Organization: Kernel Hackers 'r' Us
Lines: 32
Message-ID: <CGD.93Apr3193340@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU>
References: <9304032124.AA07711.cgdtry2@hrd769.brooks.af.mil>
NNTP-Posting-Host: erewhon.cs.berkeley.edu
In-reply-to: burgess@hrd769.brooks.af.mil's message of 3 Apr 1993 19:17:53 -0800

In article <9304032124.AA07711.cgdt...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil> 
burg...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil (Dave Burgess) writes:
>1.8.5 Why shouldn't I get my distribution from UUNet?
>
>UUNET has a policy against binaries, so you won't be able to boot up if you 
>do download it.  This makes getting started impossible, and generally creates 
>more trouble than it solves.  Use 'archie' or the list above to get
>REAL distributions.


this is false.

the entire distribution, binaries and all is in
	/systems/unix/386BSD on ftp.uu.net


this "no binaries" policy was amended not long after 0.1 came
out, when they got more disk space.

they have the full distribution, including "0.1-ports" and
all of unofficial (including "from-ref")...


there is no valid reason not to get it from uunet.



chris
--
Chris G. Demetriou                                    c...@cs.berkeley.edu

   "386bsd as depth first search: whenever you go to fix something you
       find that 3 more things are actually broken." -- Adam Glass

Path: gmd.de!Germany.EU.net!mcsun!uunet!usc!howland.reston.ans.net!agate!
soda.berkeley.edu!wjolitz
From: wjol...@soda.berkeley.edu (William F. Jolitz)
Newsgroups: comp.os.386bsd.questions
Subject: Re: FAQ_01. First Draft.
Date: 5 Apr 1993 16:12:53 GMT
Organization: U.C. Berkeley, CS Undergraduate Association
Lines: 15
Message-ID: <1pplq5$f6b@agate.berkeley.edu>
References: <9304032124.AA07711.cgdtry2@hrd769.brooks.af.mil> 
<CGD.93Apr3193340@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU>
NNTP-Posting-Host: soda.berkeley.edu

In article <CGD.93Apr3193...@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU> c...@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU 
(Chris G. Demetriou) writes:
>In article <9304032124.AA07711.cgdt...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil> 
>burg...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil (Dave Burgess) writes:
>>1.8.5 Why shouldn't I get my distribution from UUNet?
>>
>there is no valid reason not to get it from uunet.
>
Don't get it from uunet.

While the "no binaries" policy may have vanished (after all, they're making
money off of anyone sucking it off anyways), the primary reason is still valid.




Bill.

Newsgroups: comp.os.386bsd.questions
Path: gmd.de!newsserver.jvnc.net!howland.reston.ans.net!wupost!sdd.hp.com!
saimiri.primate.wisc.edu!usenet.coe.montana.edu!nate
From: n...@cs.montana.edu (Nate Williams)
Subject: Re: FAQ_01. First Draft.
Message-ID: <1993Apr5.184733.26883@coe.montana.edu>
Sender: use...@coe.montana.edu (USENET News System)
Organization: CS
References: <9304032124.AA07711.cgdtry2@hrd769.brooks.af.mil> 
<CGD.93Apr3193340@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU> <1pplq5$f6b@agate.berkeley.edu>
Date: Mon, 5 Apr 1993 18:47:33 GMT
Lines: 34

In article <1pplq5$...@agate.berkeley.edu> wjol...@soda.berkeley.edu 
(William F. Jolitz) writes:
>
>In article <CGD.93Apr3193...@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU> c...@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU 
>(Chris G. Demetriou) writes:
>>In article <9304032124.AA07711.cgdt...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil> 
>>burg...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil (Dave Burgess) writes:
>>>1.8.5 Why shouldn't I get my distribution from UUNet?
>>>
>>there is no valid reason not to get it from uunet.
>>
>Don't get it from uunet.
>
>While the "no binaries" policy may have vanished (after all, they're making
>money off of anyone sucking it off anyways), the primary reason is still valid.
>
>Bill.

No offense intended to Bill, but uunet has been, and continues to
provide many services for free, including downloading the 386BSD
distribution from any internet host.  Also, some people don't have any
EASY way of dowloading the distribution, and uunet's 900 service is one
of many cost-effective ways of downloading the distribution.   I don't
think politics should enter this discussion.

DEC makes money, uunet makes money, so what?  In the end, we all win.

Let's try and keep politics out of this..

My thoughts,

Nate
-- 
os...@terra.oscs.montana.edu |  Still trying to find a good reason for
n...@cs.montana.edu          |  these 'computer' things.  Personally,
work #: (406) 994-4836       |  I don't think they'll catch on - 
home #: (406) 586-0579       |                            Don Hammerstrom

Path: gmd.de!ira.uka.de!yale.edu!nigel.msen.com!sdd.hp.com!elroy.jpl.nasa.gov!
swrinde!cs.utexas.edu!natinst.com!hrd769.brooks.af.mil!not-for-mail
From: burg...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil (Dave Burgess)
Newsgroups: comp.os.386bsd.questions
Subject: Re: FAQ_01. First Draft.
Date: 5 Apr 1993 16:56:07 -0500
Organization: Armstrong Lab MIS, Brooks AFB TX
Lines: 37
Message-ID: <1pq9toINN81s@hrd769.brooks.af.mil>
References: <9304032124.AA07711.cgdtry2@hrd769.brooks.af.mil> 
<CGD.93Apr3193340@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU> <1pplq5$f6b@agate.berkeley.edu>
NNTP-Posting-Host: hrd769.brooks.af.mil

In article <1pplq5$...@agate.berkeley.edu> wjol...@soda.berkeley.edu 
(William F. Jolitz) writes:
>In article <CGD.93Apr3193...@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU> c...@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU 
>(Chris G. Demetriou) writes:
>>In article <9304032124.AA07711.cgdt...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil> 
>>burg...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil (Dave Burgess) writes:
>>>1.8.5 Why shouldn't I get my distribution from UUNet?
>>>
>>there is no valid reason not to get it from uunet.
>>
>Don't get it from uunet.
>
>While the "no binaries" policy may have vanished (after all, they're making
>money off of anyone sucking it off anyways), the primary reason is still valid.
>

Hello all,
  I am removing this from the FAQ altogether.

Reason 1.  

  There were two reasons listed in the FAQ.  The first made Bill Jolitz sound
petty.  In an attempt to avoid besmirching his character, I included the rest 
of the description from the original FAQ.

Reason 2.

  The only reason with technical merit was proven to be false.

In short.  The only reason left makes Bill look bad.  I refuse to make Bill
look bad.  Period.  I like his work too much to have something like this in a 
document that I am supposed to be writing.  Whatever the politics, whatever the
personal reasons, I feel that this is too divisive a subject to continue with.


-- 
------
TSgt Dave Burgess
NCOIC AL/Management Information Systems Office
Brooks AFB, TX

Path: gmd.de!newsserver.jvnc.net!howland.reston.ans.net!agate!soda.berkeley.edu!
wjolitz
From: wjol...@soda.berkeley.edu (William F. Jolitz)
Newsgroups: comp.os.386bsd.questions
Subject: Re: FAQ_01. First Draft.
Date: 13 Apr 1993 21:31:08 GMT
Organization: U.C. Berkeley, CS Undergraduate Association
Lines: 124
Message-ID: <1qfbes$lmc@agate.berkeley.edu>
References: <CGD.93Apr3193340@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU> 
<1pplq5$f6b@agate.berkeley.edu> <1993Apr5.184733.26883@coe.montana.edu>
NNTP-Posting-Host: soda.berkeley.edu

In article <1993Apr5.184733.26...@coe.montana.edu> n...@cs.montana.edu 
(Nate Williams) writes:
>In article <1pplq5$...@agate.berkeley.edu> wjol...@soda.berkeley.edu 
>(William F. Jolitz) writes:
>>
>>In article <CGD.93Apr3193...@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU> 
>>c...@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU (Chris G. Demetriou) writes:
>>>In article <9304032124.AA07711.cgdt...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil> 
>>>burg...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil (Dave Burgess) writes:
>>>>1.8.5 Why shouldn't I get my distribution from UUNet?
>>>>
>>>there is no valid reason not to get it from uunet.
>>>
>>Don't get it from uunet.
>>
>>While the "no binaries" policy may have vanished (after all, they're making
>>money off of anyone sucking it off anyways), the primary reason is still valid.
>>
>>Bill.
>
>No offense intended to Bill, but uunet has been, and continues to
>provide many services for free, including downloading the 386BSD
>distribution from any internet host.  Also, some people don't have any
>EASY way of dowloading the distribution, and uunet's 900 service is one
>of many cost-effective ways of downloading the distribution.   I don't
>think politics should enter this discussion.
>
>DEC makes money, uunet makes money, so what?  In the end, we all win.
>
>Let's try and keep politics out of this..
>
>My thoughts,
>

Nate, Dave, Chris:


Perhaps I'm not communicating concisely on this topic, so I'll take the
time to do it justice. If any of you continue to have trouble with this,
please call me directly and I'll explain in detail.

We have not seen the last of the "legal" battles by any stretch. In fact,
there is a considerable number of "quiet" battles underway at the moment,
partly because of the good judge's decision. If you think they are all
motivated out of altruism, you are very naive. And if you think that the
outcome won't affect your access to this basic technology, stop reading
this and go stick your head back into the ground.

It would be wonderful to say that there's a group of cooperative people
here all working to the same end with BSD -- after all, the region is
so vast that we don't have enough people to throw at all of the interesting
areas as it is -- there is room for all. Yet that has never happened.

Instead, there has been a number of "pitched battles", various sides
playing childish games to damage another side's funding/financing.
Lawsuits have been started entirely on the basis of "well, if you're so 
ripped off, you'd better sue or else we won't believe your claims ..".
Many relatively innocent people have walked into firestorms by accident,
totally unaware of the intense conflict underway. Like an iceberg, it's
90 % hidden.

Had I known this line of events would have occured, I don't know if
I ever would have:

	* introduced Mike Karels to my 11/40 UNIX system in the Molecular
	  Biology Department in the late 70's.
	* taken it upon myself to move Berkeley UNIX onto the 386 in 1989.
	-or-
	* help to save Berkeley UNIX from the doom of obscurity it was
	  sinking into in the early 90's.


There's quite a bit at stake at the moment, and from the attempts I've
made at dealing with the combatants, I consider that the situation is
more polarized than ever, that the degree of lobbying and rewriting of
history is at an all time high. And for good reason: all of them are
playing to win. And since "$"'s are the central goal here in winning,
all sides would very much like a situation that they can profit from.
Trouble is, each wants to be the sole beneficiary and the sole controlling
influence. So they slant the telling of history as needed to support
their conclusions. Not much of a surprise here.

Now, you'd think that 386BSD would be outside of this "mud-wrestling". You'd
think that a tiny, little system that evens the field and is available to
all would be completely orthogonal to the process. It isn't. Instead, it
graphically illustrates the stakes to all sides, and as it marches on to
more improved stature, it applies pressure on all the parties at once to
act reasonably and resolve the conflicts. It does this by standing alone.

Which does not mean we have not entertained incoming fire from each of
these wonderful groups. We have. That is why we don't recommend in our
releases involvement with groups/companies that privately threaten or
indirectly injure us, while publically proclaiming the opposite. These
incidents are non-trivial, and are well-documented, and in some cases
even witnessed. Even better, some members of the press have been silently
noting them over the last few years.

Indeed, we are even prohibited from working with the University on subsequent
releases on their request, in writing. We are furnished no bug information
from these other groups; indeed, they use bugs in 386BSD to justify their
position. And they continue to attempt to play us off against the other sides.
This is no game.

If you happen to be on one of these sides, be my guest, cheer them on and
listen lovingly to the lies they feed you. I have no trouble with this,
you've a right to choose your own poison. However, don't expect us to
upend the bottle with you.

Perhaps we have been too quiet recently, since we've been busily working
on a new release (more fun than answering this claptrap), but be forwarned:
we are quite aware of the situation. But the releases will continue,
and that's final.

Bill.


BTW, I sure hope that much of the sealed testimony is unsealed eventually.
I'm sure it will make interesting reading.


ABTW, as to the parenthetical comment about making money, that was just
irony, in reference to that company's original "noodle-brained" reaction to
386BSD 0.0. They decided to make up a scare story about viruses to avoid
needing to put up the release when I asked them to. After a few "go-rounds",
where it was pointed out to them that a 20MB+ release download would makee
them money after all, I gave up and sent people elsewhere. So it's ironic
that they eventually opted for the money after all.

Path: gmd.de!newsserver.jvnc.net!howland.reston.ans.net!agate!agate.berkeley.edu!cgd
From: c...@eden.CS.Berkeley.EDU (Chris G. Demetriou)
Newsgroups: comp.os.386bsd.questions
Subject: Re: FAQ_01. First Draft.
Date: 13 Apr 93 16:43:03
Organization: Kernel Hackers 'r' Us
Lines: 101
Message-ID: <CGD.93Apr13164303@eden.CS.Berkeley.EDU>
References: <CGD.93Apr3193340@erewhon.CS.Berkeley.EDU> <1pplq5$f6b@agate.berkeley.edu>
	<1993Apr5.184733.26883@coe.montana.edu> <1qfbes$lmc@agate.berkeley.edu>
NNTP-Posting-Host: eden.cs.berkeley.edu
In-reply-to: wjolitz@soda.berkeley.edu's message of 13 Apr 1993 21:31:08 GMT

[ here we go again... ]

In article <1qfbes$...@agate.berkeley.edu> wjol...@soda.berkeley.edu 
(William F. Jolitz) writes:
=>Perhaps I'm not communicating concisely on this topic, so I'll take the
=>time to do it justice. If any of you continue to have trouble with this,
=>please call me directly and I'll explain in detail.

if you can't communicate it sensibly in writing, talking about it
surely won't help; interactive fora do little to allow a clear
statement of one's points.

=>We have not seen the last of the "legal" battles by any stretch. In fact,
=>there is a considerable number of "quiet" battles underway at the moment,
=>partly because of the good judge's decision. If you think they are all
=>motivated out of altruism, you are very naive. And if you think that the
=>outcome won't affect your access to this basic technology, stop reading
=>this and go stick your head back into the ground.

there have been a considerable number of quiet battles going on
forever, or so you've been telling the world.

i've see all of one battle, and that wasn't so quiet (i.e. the USL
suit).  i can only comment on what i see.

=>There's quite a bit at stake at the moment, and from the attempts I've
=>made at dealing with the combatants, I consider that the situation is
=>more polarized than ever, that the degree of lobbying and rewriting of
=>history is at an all time high.

Frankly, from what i've seen, you and Lynne have done more to polarize
the situation than anyone else.

I, for one, think it's rather sad, and has done very much to
tarnish 386bsd...

=>[ stuff about injurious practices of various companies... ]
=>Even better, some members of the press have been silently
=>noting them over the last few years.

then they should be very easily documentable, and i'd like to
see said documentation.

frankly, for the last year, we've seen the mouth.  it'd be
nice to see the money, so to speak.

=>If you happen to be on one of these sides, be my guest, cheer them on and
=>listen lovingly to the lies they feed you. I have no trouble with this,
=>you've a right to choose your own poison. However, don't expect us to
=>upend the bottle with you.

i've a question for you:

is anyone with even a slightly different set of goals than your
own necessarily "not on your side"?  with a vastly different set,
perhaps, but how about a "slightly different" set?

how about if those goals are to create a good, solid, working system,
and not be forced into political flame wars?

=>Perhaps we have been too quiet recently, since we've been busily working
=>on a new release (more fun than answering this claptrap), but be forwarned:
=>we are quite aware of the situation. But the releases will continue,
=>and that's final.

"oh my god, i'm so scared.  i'd hate to see this thing actually
make it big time."  (so says he who found 386bsdd its first ftp site...)

what exactly is the situation, as you see it?

do you have something against speaking in a straightforward manner?

=>BTW, I sure hope that much of the sealed testimony is unsealed eventually.
=>I'm sure it will make interesting reading.

can't argue with that.

=>ABTW, as to the parenthetical comment about making money, that was just
=>irony, in reference to that company's original "noodle-brained" reaction to
=>386BSD 0.0. They decided to make up a scare story about viruses to avoid
=>needing to put up the release when I asked them to.

'scuse me?  i don't recall anything ever said about that?
their statements indicated, from day one, that they simply did not
have the disk space to deal with keeping binaries around.
when that changed, 386bsd went up.




<sigh>



chris
who's buried 10 feet deep in release engineering, and has better
things to do than this...
--
Chris G. Demetriou                                    c...@cs.berkeley.edu

   "386bsd as depth first search: whenever you go to fix something you
       find that 3 more things are actually broken." -- Adam Glass

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saimiri.primate.wisc.edu!ames!agate!agate!usenet
From: burg...@hrd769.brooks.af.mil (Dave Burgess)
Newsgroups: comp.os.386bsd.announce,comp.os.386bsd.questions
Subject: 386bsd/NetBSD FAQ Section 1
Followup-To: comp.os.386bsd.questions
Date: 15 May 1993 22:11:53 -0700
Organization: University of California, Berkeley
Lines: 552
Sender: c...@agate.berkeley.edu
Approved: 386bsd-announce-requ...@agate.berkeley.edu
Message-ID: <9305131743.AA13410@hrd769.brooks.af.mil>
NNTP-Posting-Host: agate.berkeley.edu



Section 1. (General Network Information)
General information

  This section of the FAQ is about the electronic support network that
  exists for 386bsd.  

1.0 What is 386BSD? (Taken from the INSTALL.NOTES)

     Welcome to 386BSD Release 0.1, the second edition of the 386BSD 
  operating system created by William and Lynne Jolitz.  Like its 
  predecessor, 386BSD Release 0.0, Release 0.1 comprises an entire and 
  complete UNIX-like operating system for the 80386/80486-based AT i
  Personal Computer.

     386BSD Release 0.1 is an enhanced version of the original release done 
  by William F. Jolitz, the developer of 386BSD.  386BSD Release 0.0 was 
  based on the Networking Software, Release 2 from the University of 
  California at Berkeley EECS Department, and included much of the 386BSD
  work done earlier by Bill and contributed by us to the University. The 
  latest release, 386BSD Release 0.1, contains new work by the developer 
  and many new items which have been freely contributed by other software 
  developers for incorporation into 386BSD (see the file CONTRIB.LIST).
  These contributions have increased the functionality and made it more 
  robust.  As a courtesy to the developer and the many people who have 
  generously contributed these software enhancements, we request that 
  users abide by and properly maintain all attributions, copyrights, and 
  copylefts contained within this release.

      386BSD is intended to foster new research and development in 
  operating systems and networking technology by providing this base 
  technology in a broadly accessible manner.  As such, like its 
  predecessor, 386BSD Release 0.1 is freely redistributable and modifiable.
 
1.1 Feature summary

  Among the many features of 386BSD:

  *    New "Tiny 386BSD" System Installation Floppy

  *    Simplified installation procedures.

  *    386BSD partitioning for use on an MS-DOS system.

  *    Compressed, multivolume CPIO dump format binary/source/other 
       distribution sets on MS-DOS floppies.
  
  *    387 emulation.

  *    SCSI support.

  *    CD-ROM support.

  *    NFS, TCP/IP and full networking.

  *    New 386BSD "Fix-It" System Maintenance Floppy.

  *    New "Additional User Software" MS-DOS floppy dump.


1.2	The future of 386BSD.

  Forecasting the future is always a tricky business.  There is work underway
  to implement version 0.2 of 386bsd.  In addition, many people are involved
  in a project to put together a 386bsd version 0.1.5, which will be a 
  complete distribution set including all relevant patches and updates to 
  new versions of many of the software packages that are currently available.
  
  To see the Future of 386bsd as seen by Bill and Lynne Jolitz, I suggest you
  read the INSTALL.NOTES that come with 386bsd.


1.3	386BSD software projects in progress

  The list of software projects in progress is just too volatile to go into a
  static document like the FAQ.  Suffice it to say, if there is something
  you want to do using 386bsd; ask first to see what has been done.

  Nate Williams (n...@bsd.coe.montana.edu) has volunteered to be the focal 
  point for software projects.  His job will be to get people with similar 
  interests together to minimize wasted effort and people working at cross 
  purposes.
 

1.3.1	Contacting software authors

  Whenever you are working on a port of a software package, it is always a
  good idea to contact the original author and offer whatever changes
  you needed to make in order to port the software.  That way, subsequent
  releases of the package may include changes that allow all users of
  386bsd the advantage of reusing your work over and over.

  Also, once you have ported a package to 386BSD, you might want to send
  a note to either Nate WIlliams (n...@bsd.coe.montana.edu) letting him
  know that you have completed a package and where it is available.

  If the port was a simple recompile of the source and install, a note
  to one of the newsgroups telling the story could be considered 
  appropriate as well.  

  In keeping with that, if you find a 'bug' in 386bsd, or find a problem
  that causes you some headaches and find a solution, you should contact
  the author of the particular driver/module/program and let them know.   
  In addition, you could also post the problem and/or fix to
  "comp.os.386bsd.bugs".

1.4	Minimum hardware configuration recommended

  There has been considerable debate about what the REAL minimum configuration
  for 386bsd is.  Some would claim that it is the smallest computer that an
  installation will succeed on.  Others claim that it is the smallest usable
  computer (based on RAM and speed constraints) and others would claim that it
  should be based on using 'X'-windows.
 
  For specific hardware, see Section 8.

  The smallest install-able platform is an 80386, using an MGA card, with at 
  least 2Meg of RAM and a 20 Megabyte hard disk.  While not all SCSI cards 
  (especially EISA) are supported, a great many are either in the base 
  distribution or through patches.  This configuration is tricky to prepare, 
  and will certainly be hard to use, but it is possible.

  A comfortable installation which includes source and binary distributions, 
  as well as other utilities will work in about 100Meg or hard drive.  
  
  'X' requires at least a Hercules MGA; for masochists only, from what I 
  understand.

  See section 8 for more details.


1.5	Where to get the source and binaries


1.5.1	Forms available (floppy, FTP, CDROM)

  386bsd is available in just about every format known to man, with the
  possible exception of stone tablets and papyrus.


1.5.1.1 Where can I get the distribution on floppy or tape?

  Many people will copy files onto diskettes or tapes if you coordinate it
  with them ahead of time.  In addition, many companies offer 386bsd on
  various types of media for money.  Austin Code Works and others (usually
  advertisers in PC magazines) offer the base 0.1 "official" distribution
  for a fee.
    
  Note that there are virtually no restrictions on distributing the 386bsd 
  distributions.  Basically, wherever you can find it, you can get it.


1.5.1.2 Where can I get the distribution via FTP?

  The files you should look for specifically when using FTP are directories
  called srcdist, bindist, and etcdist.  These directories will hold the
  files for each of the distributions.  Once you have received the files
  via FTP, you can either load them directly onto your system and then 
  un archive them using 'extract' or one of the other methods suggested in 
  Section 2 of the FAQ.
  
  The list of sites that have 386BSD is covered in section 1.8 below.  This
  list is produced autmatically by using a utility called 'archie' and is
  updated for every new version of the FAQ.  If you try to access a site 
  from this list and find that they either don't have FTP enabled, or don't
  have 386bsd loaded any more, a polite letter to the admin of the system
  asking them to update their 'archie' entries is good manners.
  
  
1.5.1.3 Where can I get the distribution on CD ROM?
  
  Info-Magic sells one, and there are probably others in the works.
  In all likelihood, the version 386bsd that is available on CD-ROM 
  will be the 0.1 version, without any patches.  Keep this in mind 
  when ordering, since the first thing most people want to do is bring 
  the system up to the current patch level.
 
  For our European users, I have included this note from Julian Stacey,
  (sta...@guug.de) concerning locations and methods for getting 386bsd 
  on in Europe on both CD-ROM and floppies.
  
  From: 

  In Munich Germany:
  Buy the monthly "c't magazin fuer computer technik" (Price 8.5 DM) 
  (~1.4 or 1.5 DM = $1) & look in back pages, I saw:

	Mail Order:
		JF Lehmanns Buchhandlung, fuer EDV, 
		Zuelpicher Str 182, 5000 Koeln 41, Germany
		Free catalogue for X, Linux, 386bsd, unix.
		Confusing advert seems to offer X11R5 + GNU + 386BSD 
		on CD Rom "InfoMagic Vol2 No2" for Price: 149 DM.
		Tel. 0130 4372 (allways busy, claims to be free, 
			so dont know if +49 130 4372 viable)
		Fax: +49 221 415995
		Shops in Berlin, Koeln, Regensburg, Ulm.

  (Editorial Note:  DM149 is about $75-$90 (or a little more)

	Mail Order:
		Computer Solutions Software GmbH
		Postfach 1180, Grafing/Muenchen, D-W 8018 Germany
		Tel +49 8092 5018
		Fax +49 8092 31727
		23 * 3.5" 1.4M flops @ Price: DM199
		Order No:/Best Nr: 5099
		Shop: 
			Columbus Datentechnik,
			Theresienstr 63, Muenchen, D-W 8000, Germany
			Tel +49 89 5232021

  Lynne wrote a short followup, letting us know that these companies do
  not send them any money.

  ( Linux was advertised in the mag. @ 89DM, both Linux & 386BSD distribs.
  were offered as something over 20 1M floppies )

  Many people would happily undercut high price commercial distributors,
  pocket some for media & copying hastle & forward remainder to subsidise
  Bill & Co's development efforts.

  This information is offered with no warranties, guarantees, franchise
  offers, or recommendations.
          
1.6	Electronic Information Groups for 386BSD

1.6.1	Usenet newsgroups

comp.os.386bsd.announce 
	Announcements relating to the 386bsd operating system. (Moderated)
	Announcements should be mailed to cgd using the address
	"386bsd-annou...@agate.berkeley.edu".
comp.os.386bsd.apps
	Applications which run under 386bsd.
comp.os.386bsd.bugs
	Bugs and fixes for the 386bsd OS and its clients.
comp.os.386bsd.development
	Working on 386bsd internals.
comp.os.386bsd.misc 
	General aspects of 386bsd not covered by other groups.
comp.os.386bsd.questions
	General questions about 386bsd.


1.6.2	Newsgroup archives.
  
  These sites maintain a historical record of the traffic in the Usenet
  Newsgroups indicated.  There are others, but I haven't gotten their
  names yet.

Host Name            IP address     Location        Newgroups archived
-------------------- -------------- --------------  ---------------- 
minnie.cs.adfa.oz.au 131.236.20.70  Australia       comp.unix.bsd
src.doc.ic.ac.uk     146.169.2.1    London, UK      comp.os.386bsd.*


1.6.3	386bsd mailing lists.

  There are at least two mailing lists for 386bsd.  Both are for discussions
  of the patchkit and patches.  They are:

  386bsd_patch...@cs.montana.edu: 
		This list is primarily for discussion of the patchkit and other
		patch procedure discussions.
  patc...@cs.montana.edu: 
		This list is for patch submissions.

  NOTE: The patchkit is discussed in detail in Section 2 of the FAQ.


1.6.4	Other electronic resources.

  There are many bulletin boards throughout the world that have 386bsd 
  software and information available.   Also, there are Compuserve and 
  other on-line services that have 386bsd discussions.
  
      
1.7	Documentation available

  There are two types of documentation for 386bsd.  First is the set that
  covers the operation and theory used in BSD-Unix.  These sources are
  often excellent for background and understanding of the current 
  implementation of 386bsd.  Second is the set of manuals written 
  specifically for 386bsd.  Most of these are books and magazine articles 
  written by Bill and Lynne Jolitz.
    

1.7.1	BSD manuals

  The full set of BSD documentation is available via anonymous FTP from
  ocf.berkeley.edu in /pub/Library/Computer/doc4.3.  To print this 
  documentation on 386bsd systems, replace the ditroff references in the
  Makefile with 'groff -e -t -msU {SRC} >out.ps' to generate PostScript
  format files.  Use different options to make the output conform to other
  print styles.

  The etc distribution also comes with a documentation directory
  ~/share/doc which has nearly 3Meg of documentation about 386bsd.
    
  In addition, an on-line manual is available (in the binary distribution 
  set).  It contains specific information on the use of UNIX utilities and 
  commands.  Type "man man" for information on the online manual.
  

1.7.2	BSD books

  There is an excellent set of works recommended by Bill and Lynne in the
  INSTALL.NOTES.  In addition, these books have been recommended by
  Andrew Moore and others.

  For learning how to work in the Unix environment, the standard text
  is "The Unix Programming Environment,"  by Kernighan and Pike.
  
  For Unix Administration, the best is "Unix System Administration
  Handbook," by Nemeth, Snyder and Seebass.

  For systems level programming (i.e., systems calls), I recommend
  "Advanced Unix Programming," by Marc Rochkind.  Unfortunately it is
  outdated and oriented towards System V.  A new book "Advanced
  Programming in the Unix Environment," by W.  Richard Stevens is very
  up-to-date, and an excellent reference.

  For network programming, "Unix Network Programming," by W. Richard
  Stevens is highly regarded.
  
  The 4.3BSD Unix Manuals contain loads of invaluable tutorials and
  historical papers in addition to hard copies of on-line documentation.
  The six volume set is available from Usenix for $60.00 (email:
  off...@usenix.org)

  I could go on, but let me mention just two more - if you have a full
  386BSD installation, you may want to learn the bash shell (in
  /usr/othersrc/public).  This is an extension of the Bourne shell (sh)
  with features from both the C shell (Csh) and the Korn shell (Ksh).
  The Korn shell is described in "The Kornshell," by Korn (of course).
  
  Second, I recommend you look at "The AWK Programming Language," by Aho,
  Weinberger and Kernighan.  This is a very nice prototyping language -
  powerful and easy to use.

  Another excellent reference book for 386bsd is "The Design and 
  Implementation of the 4.3BSD UNIX Operating system" by  Samuel J. 
  Leffler, Marshall Kirk McKusick, Michael J. Karels, John S. Quarterman
  1989, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-06196-1.  While this book is 
  out of date in many sections, it is purported to be an excellent 
  source of historical information, if nothing else.  Chris Demetriou
  recommends the sections on the treatment of file systems, caching and
  the networking layer.  The sections in this books which do not apply to
  386bsd include the VM section, bootstrapping, and autoconfig.

  In addition, there are many other books which, for one reason or another,
  have not made it into this brief list.  Rest assured that this is not
  intended to be an exhaustive list by any means.  In fact, Lynne Jolitz has
  offered to supply the FAQ with her preferred reading list describing the
  current and future versions of 386bsd.  


1.7.3	The Jolitz Book

  Bill and Lynne Jolitz are writing a book about 386bsd.  It will be announced
  once it is ready.  A tentative date of late 1992 was once offered, but since
  it is early 1993 and no book has been announced, we can assume that it will
  be later than the original estimate.
 

1.7.4	Dr. Dobbs' journal

  For users who wish to understand the internals of the 386BSD system 
  developed by William F. Jolitz from 1989 to the present, the most 
  immediate and available reference is the feature series entitled 
  "Porting UNIX to the 386: A Practical Approach", appearing in Dr. 
  Dobbs' Journal, USA (January 1991 to July 1992) and UNIX and iX 
  Magazines, Germany (June 1991 to present). For inquiries on the 
  article series (including reprints),  contact the magazines for 
  information.

  "Porting UNIX to the 386: A Practical Approach" (feature series) by
  Jolitz and Jolitz
  
   1/91: DDJ		"Designing a Software Specification"
   2/91: DDJ		"Three Initial PC Utilities"
   3/91: DDJ		"The Standalone System"
   4/91: DDJ		"Copyright, Copyleft, and Competitive Advantage"
   4/91: DDJ		"Language Tools Cross-Support"
   5/91: DDJ		"The Initial Root Filesystem"
   6/91: DDJ		"Research and the Commercial Sector: Where Does 
				BSD Fit In?"
   7/91: DDJ		"A Stripped-Down Kernel"
   8/91: DDJ		"The Basic Kernel"
   9/91: DDJ		"Multiprogramming and Multiprocessing, Part I"
  10/91: DDJ		"Multiprogramming and Multiprocessing, Part II"
  11/91: DDJ		"Device Autoconfiguration"
   2/92: DDJ		"UNIX Device Drivers, Part I"
   3/92: DDJ		"UNIX Device Drivers, Part II"
   4/92: DDJ		"UNIX Device Drivers, Part III"
   5/92: DDJ		"Missing Pieces, Part I"
   6/92: DDJ		"Missing Pieces, Part II"
   7/92: DDJ		"The Final Step: Running Light with 386BSD"
  
  You can contact M&T Books (DDJ) for reprints if you can't get them from 
  your technical library:
  
	1-800-356-2002 (inside CA)
	1-800-533-4372 (North America)
	1-415-358-9500 (international)
 
   6/91: UNIX Magazin	"Portierung von BSD-UNIX auf den 80386. Heimlich 
				Liebe."
   7/91: UNIX Magazin	"Steighilfe."
   8/91: UNIX Magazin	"Systemverwaltung durch Tabellen"
   9/91: UNIX Magazin	"Sicher bewegen auf fremdem Terrain"
  10/91: UNIX Magazin	"Damit die Fehlersuche nicht zum Hurdenspringen 
				wird"
  11/91: UNIX Magazin	"Alles in eine Schublade"
  12/91: UNIX Magazin	"Feuer und Wasser"
   1/92: UNIX Magazin	"Rekursives Speicher-Mapping"
   2/92: UNIX Magazin	"Tanz auf dem Eis"
   3/92: UNIX Magazin	"Aus Hanschen wird Hans"
   4/92: UNIX Magazin	"Das Geheimnis des Multiprogramming"
   5/92: UNIX Magazin	"Zeitmanagement scheibenweise"
   6/92: UNIX Magazin	"Magie des Kernels"
   7/92: UNIX Magazin	"Erkenne Dich Selbst"
   9/92: UNIX Magazin	"Niemand is eine Insel"
  10/92: UNIX Magazin	"Treiberlatein"
  12/92: UNIX Magazin	"Einlandung erforderlich" 
   1/93: iX Magazin	"??"
   2/93: iX Magazin	"??"  - Titles Unknown
   3/93: iX Magazin	"??"
   4/93: iX Magazin	"??"
  
  NOTE: The series in UNIX Magazin was moved to IX Magazin in 1/93.
  
  In addition, other major articles which discuss 386BSD in detail:
  
   8/92: UNIX Magazin "Interview mit Bill Jolitz. Das passiert mit 386BSD"
	by Jurgen Fey
   8/92: DDJ "Very High-Speed Networking" by W.F. Jolitz
  12/92: DDJ "Inside the ISO-9660 Filesystem Format" by Jolitz and Jolitz
  
 Reprints of the first 19 parts on the UNIX Magazin series are available 
  from:
  
	iX Redaktion
	Stichwort: 386BSD-Serie
	Verlag Heinz Heise GmbH & Co KG
	Helstorfer Str. 7
	3000 Hannover 61
  
  Some of the parts are without code listings due to the unclear status of the  
  BSD releases stemming from the Net/2 release.
  
  
1.7.5	Other FAQ's on the net that are relevant
  
  There are many FAQs that can be used in conjunction with 386bsd.  These 
  include the FAQs for all of the GNU software, the different shells that are
  available, the programming languages that are available, and many more.
  In addition, many programs have their own FAQ which should be referenced
  whenever that package is being added.  Good examples of the latter are
  the FAQs for elm, C-News, and innd.
   
  The observant reader will notice that there are very few 'X' questions in 
  this FAQ.  The XFree86 FAQ is posted regularly to comp.os.386bsd.*.  There 
  is no good reason to include any 'X' questions in this FAQ, with the 
  exception of the most basic 'Where can I get the 'X' FAQ'.
  
  Most FAQs are available by anonymous FTP from rtfm.mit.edu and via Usenet
  News in news.answers and/or comp.answers.
  
  
1.8	FTP sites for 386BSD
  
  A standard tool on Internet connected hosts for finding files is 'archie'.  
  Searching the archie archive for "386BSD" yields the following list.
  Searching for 386bsd will also yield a long list of sites.  For UUCP
  sites, FTP-Mail is available from gatekeeper.dec.com.
  
  For those folks that have access to telnet, but not FTP, you can use archie
  by using telnet and connecting to 132.206.2.3.  Log in as 'archie' and use
  the 'prog' command to find programs of interest.

  Host					Directory
  agate.berkeley.edu			/pub/386BSD/
  animal-farm.nevada.edu		/pub/386BSD/
  archive.afit.af.mil			/pub/386BSD/
  ascwide.ascii.co.jp			/pub/386BSD/
  bode.ee.ualberta.ca			/pub/OS/386BSD/
  capella.eetech.mcgill.ca		/pub/386BSD/
  chook.cs.adelaide.edu.au		/pub/386BSD/
  chook.cs.adelaide.edu.au		/pub/XFree86-1.1/386BSD/
  cs.ubc.ca				/mirror3/386BSD/
  delbruck.pharm.sunysb.edu		/pub/386BSD/
  f.ms.uky.edu				/pub2/386BSD/
  ftp.cs.uni-sb.de			/pub/386BSD/
  ftp.denet.dk				/pub/OS/386BSD/
  ftp.uu.net				/systems/unix/386BSD/
  goya.dit.upm.es			/info/unix/386BSD/
  grasp1.univ-lyon1.fr			/pub/unix/386BSD/
  isfs.kuis.kyoto-u.ac.jp		/BSD/386BSD/
  jhunix.hcf.jhu.edu			/pub/public_domain_software/386BSD/
  kirk.bu.oz.au				/pub/OS/386BSD/
  math.orst.edu				/pub/386BSD/
  math12.mathematik.uni-bielefeld.de	/pub/ibm_pc/386BSD/
  mcsun.eu.net				/packages/386BSD/
  miki.cs.titech.ac.jp			/pub/os/386BSD/
  minnie.zdv.uni-mainz.de		/pub0/pub/386BSD/
  plains.nodak.edu			/pub/386BSD/
  plan9.njit.edu			/pub/386BSD/
  pprg.eece.unm.edu			/pub/386BSD/
  procyon.cis.ksu.edu			/pub/386BSD/
  quepasa.cs.tu-berlin.de		/pub/os/386BSD/
  reseq.regent.e-technik.tu-muenchen.de	/informatik.public2/BSD/386BSD/
  rs3.hrz.th-darmstadt.de		/pub/os/386BSD/
  sifon.cc.mcgill.ca			/pub/packages/386BSD/
  switek.uni-muenster.de		/pub/386BSD/
  theta.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp		/386BSD/
  unix.hensa.ac.uk			/pub/uunet/systems/unix/386BSD/
  walhalla.germany.eu.net		/pub/comp/i386/386BSD/
  wnoc-fuk.wide.ad.jp			/pub/386BSD/

  The code may soon also to be available, or perhaps is already available,
  from both CompuServe and BIX.

1.8.2	Official distribution sites

  According to Lynne Jolitz, there is no such thing as an 'official' 386bsd
  site.  The closest we have is 'agate.berkeley.edu' which is mirrored
  at several of the sites listed above.

1.8.3	Reference sites

  For a brief period, ref.tfs.com was available for use as a reference system.
  This system was used as the test-bed for many programs that were ported to
  386bsd by many authors.  Unfortunately, ref.tfs.com has been disabled as
  a reference system.  Once a replacement is established, it will be noted
  here.

1.8.4	Unofficial archive sites that have neat stuff!

  There are many sites that have things which have either been ported to
  386bsd or are available to the world.  Use archie to find these sites, or 
  read comp.os.386bsd.* for more information.
  
  A pointer to one of the most popular sites for ported software comes from
  mycr...@gnu.ai.mit.edu:

  alpha.gnu.ai.mit.edu:/386bsd (for ports of software).
--
Please send submissions for comp.os.386bsd.announce to:
					386bsd-annou...@agate.berkeley.edu

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