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From: "prdept" <prdept.Building#...@msmail.corp.sgi.com>
Newsgroups: comp.sys.sgi.announce
Subject: Jim Barton to Head IDS
Followup-To: comp.sys.sgi.announce
Date: 24 Jun 1994 13:28:21 -0500
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JAMES BARTON TO HEAD INTERACTIVE DIGITAL SOLUTIONS

AT&T  Network  Systems and  Silicon  Graphics  Name Media  Server
Executive President of New Company

NEW  YORK (June  22, 1994)  -- AT&T  Network Systems  and Silicon
Graphics, Inc.  (NYSE:SGI) today named James  M. Barton president
and  general  manager of  Interactive  Digital  Solutions, a  new
company  whose   mission  is  to  rapidly   develop  and  deliver
large-scale, fully integrated, interactive video server solutions
for telephone company networks and cable TV systems.

Barton formerly was vice-president and general manager of Silicon
Graphics'  Media  Systems  Division.   The  division  focuses  on
developing and  marketing servers  for the  emerging interactive,
digital media and professional media authoring marketplaces.

"As the  individual who will lead  Interactive Digital Solutions,
Jim Barton  brings with  him an  impressive understanding  of the
complexities  of  interactive  technology," said  Dan  Stanzione,
president  of AT&T  Switching  Systems and  chairman  of the  new
company.

"Jim's experience  in engineering high-performance  computing and
server  software make  him a  great choice  for leading  this new
company," Stanzione added.

"No  one is  better equipped  than Jim  Barton to  lead this  new
company into the interactive frontier," said Edward R. McCracken,
chairman and chief executive officer of Silicon Graphics.

"Since  starting  at  Silicon  Graphics eight  years  ago  as  an
operating  system  architect, Jim  has  taught  us all  important
lessons about what it takes to bring advanced multiprocessing and
media  server   technologies  to  people  in   all  disciplines,"
McCracken said.

Prior to heading Silicon Graphics' Media Systems Division, Barton
was vice-president of advanced technology, where he helped define
the company's strategy to  promote a complete system architecture
for interactive media.

His other posts at  Silicon Graphics have included vice-president
and general manager of the  System Software Division and director
of engineering for server and workstation systems development.

Before  joining Silicon  Graphics in  1986, Barton  held computer
architecture  engineering  posts  at Hewlett-Packard  Company  in
Cupertino,  California,  and Bell  Laboratories/AT&T  Information
Systems in Denver, Colorado.

Barton received a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering and
computer  science from  the  University of  Colorado at  Boulder,
where he later  earned a master's degree in  computer science. He
is a  member of  the IEEE Computer  Society, the  Association for
Computing  Machinery   and  Computer  Professionals   for  Social
Responsibility. He  has published several papers  and articles on
UNIX(r) and multiprocessing.

- end - 

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		       SCO Files Lawsuit Against IBM

March 7, 2003 - The SCO Group filed legal action against IBM in the State 
Court of Utah for trade secrets misappropriation, tortious interference, 
unfair competition and breach of contract. The complaint alleges that IBM 
made concentrated efforts to improperly destroy the economic value of 
UNIX, particularly UNIX on Intel, to benefit IBM's Linux services 
business. See SCO v IBM.

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