Tech Insider					     Technology and Trends


			      USENET Archives

Newsgroups: biz.sco.general
Path: bga.com!news.sprintlink.net!howland.reston.ans.net!
cs.utexas.edu!uunet!demos1!sarnod!rashid
From: ras...@sarnode.saratov.su (Rashid Karimov)
Subject: SCO new release-what to expect from?
Organization: sarnode
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 1994 08:09:24 GMT
Message-ID: <1994Oct04.080924.29258@sarnode.saratov.su>
X-Newsreader: TIN [version 1.2 PL2]
Lines: 27


	Hi netters.


Well, the subject says it all. What can we expect from
Open Server 4.0 ( or SCO 94/95 ? :) ?And what we are expecting ?
I realize this should be treated as huge SCO's trade secret,
but just in few words ?
As for me , I'd like to see more than 64K inodes per FS,
faster networking, some leading edge net additions , like
multicasting , multi routes ( per destination )support (OSPF).
And , may be , some SCO authorized book on SCO inners .
As part of standard distribution , or add-on product ...

I'm pretty satisfied with current release. Really stable ,
perfect HW support,well documented. And good support .
IMHO , the access to SCO ftp site is only required thing :)
( I don't mention here tons of bussiness apps  ).

BTW , what the net-community thinks about current FS implementation ?
I think it's fast on _fast drives & powerful PC's.
Does any1 here knows if BSD's FS is copyrighted ? I think its
concepts of distributed inodes/blocks areas are worth to be copied/
followed .

SY
RK

Newsgroups: biz.sco.general
Path: bga.com!news.sprintlink.net!news.infi.net!taylor.infi.net!mark
From: m...@taylor.infi.net (Mark A. Davis)
Subject: Re: SCO new release-what to expect from?
Organization: Lake Taylor Hospital Computer Services
Date: Tue, 04 Oct 1994 12:25:31 GMT
Message-ID: <1994Oct04.122531.3275@taylor.infi.net>
References: <1994Oct04.080924.29258@sarnode.saratov.su>
Lines: 37

ras...@sarnode.saratov.su (Rashid Karimov) writes:

>	Hi netters.
>Well, the subject says it all. What can we expect from
>Open Server 4.0 ( or SCO 94/95 ? :) ?And what we are expecting ?
>I realize this should be treated as huge SCO's trade secret,
>but just in few words ?

I second your request.  I am still on 2.0 because I did not see much in
3.0 which excited me.....

>As for me , I'd like to see more than 64K inodes per FS,
>faster networking, some leading edge net additions , like
>multicasting , multi routes ( per destination )support (OSPF).
>And , may be , some SCO authorized book on SCO inners .
>As part of standard distribution , or add-on product ...

Maybe add these too-

* Veritas file system?

* X11R6

* New release of Motif

* COSE compliant GUI environment

* WABI

* An X11 GUI version of sysadmsh

I don't want much, do I?  :)
-- 
  /--------------------------------------------------------------------------\
  | Mark A. Davis     | Lake Taylor Hospital | Norfolk,VA (804)-461-5001x431 |
  | Director/SysAdmin | Information Systems  |    m...@taylor.infi.net       |
  \--------------------------------------------------------------------------/

Newsgroups: biz.sco.general
Path: bga.com!news.sprintlink.net!howland.reston.ans.net!cs.utexas.edu!
uunet!hobbes!scocan!larryp
From: lar...@sco.COM (Larry Philps)
Subject: Re: SCO new release-what to expect from?
Organization: SCO Canada, Inc.
Date: Wed, 05 Oct 1994 13:54:26 GMT
Message-ID: <1994Oct05.135426.34@sco.COM>
References: <1994Oct04.080924.29258@sarnode.saratov.su> 
<1994Oct04.122531.3275@taylor.infi.net>
Sender: n...@sco.COM (News administration)
Lines: 47

In <1994Oct04.122531.3...@taylor.infi.net> m...@taylor.infi.net 
(Mark A. Davis) writes:

> ras...@sarnode.saratov.su (Rashid Karimov) writes:
> 
> >	Hi netters.
> >Well, the subject says it all. What can we expect from
> >Open Server 4.0 ( or SCO 94/95 ? :) ?And what we are expecting ?
> >I realize this should be treated as huge SCO's trade secret,
> >but just in few words ?
> 
> I second your request.  I am still on 2.0 because I did not see much in
> 3.0 which excited me.....
> 
> >As for me , I'd like to see more than 64K inodes per FS,
> >faster networking, some leading edge net additions , like
> >multicasting , multi routes ( per destination )support (OSPF).
> >And , may be , some SCO authorized book on SCO inners .
> >As part of standard distribution , or add-on product ...

I am not going to say much about this, so please don't pester me,
but if you visited the Technology Demo stage at SCO Forum last August
you would have seen demonstrations of some of these things.  (Since they
were on public display I will repeat them here, but otherwise not
discuss them ... yet).

> Maybe add these too-
> 
> * Veritas file system?

A log based hi-throughput filesystem that supported more than 64k inodes,
and fast fsck.

> * WABI

That was demonstrated.

> * An X11 GUI version of sysadmsh

This was also demonstrated.  In fact, far more could be administered
with the new GUI stuff than just the stuff supported by the current
sysadmsh.

---
Larry Philps, Technical Strategist                | "The Internet treats
SCO Canada Inc.             voice: (416) 960-4012 | censorship as a malfunction
130 Bloor St. W., 10th Floor  fax: (416) 922-2704 | and just routes around it"
Toronto, Canada M5S 1N5     email: lar...@sco.com |         - John Perry Barlow

Newsgroups: biz.sco.general
Path: bga.com!news.sprintlink.net!fastnet!camco!xenitec!hobbes!timr
From: t...@sco.COM (Tim Ruckle)
Subject: Re: SCO new release-what to expect from?
Organization: The Santa Cruz Operation, Inc.
Date: Wed, 12 Oct 1994 18:22:44 GMT
Message-ID: <1994Oct12.182244.8864@sco.com>
Summary: Reliability, Scalability, Useability and Standards
Keywords: Everest
References: <m0qsuej-0007MgC@ilinx.com>
Sender: n...@sco.com (News admin)
Lines: 92


First off, it is important to understand that there has *not* been a
announcement regarding the next release of the SCO Open Server family
of products.  All SCO product announcements are posted to b.s.announce
(which I assume most biz.sco.general readers have access to) and while
SCO has announced a number of new and interesting products and services
over the past few months, ``Everest'' has not been one of them.

What does exist is a SCO engineering project which has been code-named
``Everest''.  Everest is NOT a product, however.  It is rather a set of
new and/or improved technologies which are being developed, evaluated,
refined and tested by the SCO product development team.  At this time,
SCO has made no official announcement regarding the availability of this
new technology.

This project was discussed at SCO Forum94, though, and a number of these
technologies were demonstrated there as well.  Some of this is not
entirely new news: SCO has made announcements in the past regarding
new technologies which have been licensed and are being evaluated.
WABI is one of these.  Development Systems technology is another.
Connectivity is yet another (ONC+, NetWare interoperability, etc.)

But again, it's important to note that simply checking something out
is not equivalent to announcing a product.  You can be sure that SCO
is committed to continually improving its products, and I think it's
safe to say that the focus in any new release will remain in the areas
of reliability, scalability, useability and standards.  (Support for
new hardware is now handled with frequent releases of an updated AHS.
And I imagine this model will continue to be used in the future, though
some revolutionary--rather than evolutionary--HW support advances might
be realized in a new release of the OS instead.  Please note that I am
not speaking for SCO here: this is just my best, educated guess...)  

What is not sure is when or even if any particular new technology will
end up in a shipping SCO product, and for those that do, how exactly it
will be packaged.  As such, it's both premature and incorrect to speak
of ``Everest'' as if it were an actual announced product.  It is not.

That being said, I can say that there're a number of interesting and
exciting things being worked on.  Larryp mentioned a few of these in
the filesystem area: optimized throughput, increased inodes, etc.  I
would add to this a journaling filesystem, RAID capabilities, and other
increased capacity options (i.e. greater than 2GB filesystems).  I'd
look for more SMP multithreading, perhaps with protocol stacks or the
like.  In fact, I'd fully expect SCO to remain an industry leader in
multiprocessor support overall.

Visual TCL is already being discussed in the biz.sco.vtcl newsgroup,
and SCO may well set the standard in this regard.  And it's a pretty
safe bet that SCO's commitment to Mosaic as a de facto standard, and
the Spec 1170 as an industry standard, will continue.  Supporting the
really relevant standards has been one of SCO's fortes (though I accept
that certain Novell nee USL partisans would disagree, and other folks
become impatient with the time-to-market for commercial-quality versions
of emerging technologies).

And I think the work that's been done on a graphical, distributed and
modular administration tool looks very cool indeed.  I might point out
that I began my career here at SCO as a Systems Administrator, and I
never really did like sysadmsh all that much.  But while I mostly still
prefer the command-line, this application has been very well thought-out
and appears to be (if you'll pardon the hackneyed expression) pretty
darn sexy.

Other developments being pursued include a simplified software licensing
scheme, coupled with easy network installations.  Improvements in this
area should prove to be a benefit for both SCO resellers and end users
alike.  One might envision a day wherein purchasing and installing a
SCO System will be like unto ordering a Pay-Per-View movie (though I'll
grant you that my teevee has yet to complain of any interrupt conflicts
with the cable box, and this "opportunity" presents quite a challenge).

Anyways, I hope this helps address some of Mr. Karimov's (and others')
curiosity.  Again though, nothing is really certain until and unless
an official product announcement is made.

Regards,

Tim

PS.  It's impossible to say what the pricing and upgrade policies for
some non-existent product might be, and thus I wouldn't even try to
speculate on this.  But as Mr. Murrell points out, there are definite
incentives for staying updated with the current release.  Not the least
of which is that new fixes and enhancements, as well as "intelligent"
upgrades to new product, are historically supported only for the existing
shipping release.

--
Thou seest the mountains and thou deemest them affixed, (verily) they
are as fleeting as the clouds.
                                                   --The Koran, 27:88

			      USENET Archives


The materials and information included in this website may only be used
for purposes such as criticism, review, private study, scholarship, or 
research.


Electronic mail:			       WorldWideWeb:
   tech-insider@outlook.com			  http://tech-insider.org/